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Discuss How many strands in a bowstring? at the Recurve Bow within Archery Interchange UK Forums; Ok, I'm confused! How many strands do I put in a bowstring? Can anyone explain ...
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    How many strands in a bowstring?

    Ok, I'm confused!

    How many strands do I put in a bowstring?

    Can anyone explain or point me to a good resource for this? I am particularly interested in breaking strains and % creep and elasticity or stretch for different materials.

    Found one website which offers:
    bowweight x 4 / (breaking strain)

    So for a 40lb bow on 50lb breaking strain dacron B50, makes 4 strands (doesnt sound right)

    Same site has a table showing at 40lb bow to need 12 strands dacron,18 strands fastflight. sounds better but no explanation of how we got there.

    BCY website doesnt list B50, but for their newest products, just lists "recommended number of strands=" with no regard for the bow weight at all. The explanation given is this gives the "best nock fit"
    Is that what it comes down to? Nock fit!

    I could just copy my existing string, but that is too simple! I need to understand the principals involved






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    The breaking strain on any modern material is greatly in excess of what a bow will deliver on any one shot. Having shot unlimited flight bows with 6 strands of 8125, even they managed to last for about four shots...

    There's doubtless some magical formula for what's the perfect number for maximum efficiency and minimum inconsistency and all that stuff, but really, nock fit is the only important criteria these days.

    <40#, 16 strands fastflight/8125
    >40#, 18 strands fastflight/8125.
    Convert accordingly if using Ultracam, 450 or derivatives, S4, etc...

    EDIT: Also, forgot - nock fit has a fair degree of dependency upon centreserving, so you need to figure that out when making a string.
    If you make something idiot proof, all that happens is someone builds a better idiot.

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    It's an X I've taken part in an AIUK American Shoot.I've taken part in an AIUK Ironman Shoot. Murray's Avatar
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    As materials have evolved, the strength of individual strands have far exceeded where they need to be in terms of breaking strain so yes, pretty much it comes down to nock fit. If you could enlighten us as to exactly what material you're considering, then perhaps we could suggest a suitable strand count based on experience...
    Never let the truth get in the way of a good story - Mark Twain

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    Don`t know if this will help, what worked best for me 42lb on the fingers and 26.5" draw
    with FastFlight i found 14 strands
    with Angel Majesty 16 strands
    and with BCY8125 i started at 18 strands and worked my way down to 10 strands to find out that 12 strands worked best for me
    "Where`s the CUSTARD

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    Just to add that in the past it has always been found that there was the guide line similar to what was just shown by Shirt
    But when shooting with the extra strands added, it was found that it could help make the Bow a bit more stable.
    The disadvantage was it did reduce the cast slightly. As the case of reducing the strands the bow was faster but less stable and the string was not as longlasting.


    ..Hello, Please and Thankyou..Never killed anyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murray View Post
    As materials have evolved, the strength of individual strands have far exceeded where they need to be in terms of breaking strain so yes, pretty much it comes down to nock fit. If you could enlighten us as to exactly what material you're considering, then perhaps we could suggest a suitable strand count based on experience...
    It was a generalization really. I generally use dacron b50 for the club bows and fastflight+ for my own.
    My thought was that if 4 strands was technically sufficient, why does everyone use 14? Seems, on the face of it, like a sledgehammer to crack a nut. Nock fit seems a poor reason as one could make smaller nocks, or build up the centre serving.

    Forgive me if I am using thumbscrews. I like to know the "why". Science over religion.

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    got to build in a little practicality - a four strand string with the serving 'built out' to accept a normal nock (1 or 2) would be ridiculous and would, at a higher poundage, be like trying to pull a cheese wire. t'other consideration is of course speed - I dropped my strand count (and nock size) to give me a better sight mark...

    This time I'm going to get it right .... or possibly not

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    Quote Originally Posted by grimsby archer View Post
    My thought was that if 4 strands was technically sufficient, why does everyone use 14? Seems, on the face of it, like a sledgehammer to crack a nut.
    Because the breaking strain formulas tend to be for either continual force of a given amount, or one-time fast stretches. A bow is repeated fast stretches.

    4 strands will be strong enough to string your bow, it'll even be enough to shoot it (once!) but not much more.
    If you make something idiot proof, all that happens is someone builds a better idiot.

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    TimCroot
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shirt View Post
    Because the breaking strain formulas tend to be for either continual force of a given amount, or one-time fast stretches. A bow is repeated fast stretches.

    4 strands will be strong enough to string your bow, it'll even be enough to shoot it (once!) but not much more.

    Anyone got a Hooter Shooter to do some tests? just how low can you go to keep a string in one pice for a round of 150 shots???

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    I posted this list of bow materials some time ago. It also showed how many strands of each material should be needed to build a string with breaking strains.
    [IMG][/IMG]
    The number of strands may seem unscientific as we could make do with far less these days, but I think it all comes down to nock fit as others have said.
    Nock slots tend to be in two or three different sizes. Imagine the effect of archers requiring twenty different sizes. Also , a four strand string, with a thick serving will not be easily produced. Would you serve it once then go over it and do it again?I suspect that would not be very successful as it would more than likely move. Also a few strands of X material would stretch more than 20 strands, and creep more too, making it a struggle to maintain bracing height.

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    Quote Originally Posted by geoffretired View Post
    I posted this list of bow materials some time ago. It also showed how many strands of each material should be needed to build a string with breaking strains.
    .
    Thanks, this data is very interesting. Would it be cheeky if I asked what the original source of this info was? I mean, is this something you wrote, or borrowed from another person/website/publication?

    Thanks again

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    The sheet was given to me by a friend who works for a well known archery supplier. The original source of the data I can't help with I'm afraid, I simply don't know.

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    Kae
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    Nock fit is important and is the deciding factor when choosing a string.

    But don't forget, us humble recurvers pull the string on either two or three pinkies, and using a 4 strand string would be somewhat painfull!

    I use an 18 strand 8125 string on my bow and its just thick enough to be comfortable at my draw weight.

    Kae.
    If all else fails... Panic!

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    In the Gold Rhys's Avatar
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    I found that a 16 strand string (8125), with 43lbs on my fingers and 31" draw length was a tad noisy. Going to 18 strands just felt and sounded a lot better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kae View Post
    Nock fit is important and is the deciding factor when choosing a string.

    But don't forget, us humble recurvers pull the string on either two or three pinkies, and using a 4 strand string would be somewhat painfull!

    I use an 18 strand 8125 string on my bow and its just thick enough to be comfortable at my draw weight.

    Kae.
    Couldnt both these issues be overcome by building up the serving, or laying extra strands only under the serving?



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