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Thread: arrow stability

  1. #1
    In the Red
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    Smile arrow stability

    hi fellow archer's..

    when I shot indoors at twenty yards, my arrows were very rarely straight in the target, they would be at an angle, left, right, up, down, whatever, but as I said raely straight....when I went outside and shot at thirty yards the arrows are now all straight, no sign of the of any deviation, so now I am wondering could it be that twenty yards wasn't enough time for the arrows to straighten out, and that thirty yards++ gives them the time they need.

    your thought's are most welcome, and thank you to everyone who gives me help and suggestions on this one

  2. #2
    It's an X
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    Your ideas of extra distance helping to give arrows time to straighten makes sense to me. I've always thought that way.Some archers use big fletchings to straighten their arrows at short distances for that same reason.
    There is another possibility. If the indoor target is straw and the outdoor one is foam, the straw can make arrows lie at odd angles to the target, because of the twists and windings.
    Another thought on the same subject, would be to consider how well your arrows fly. If they are badly out of line at 20yds perhaps some tuning would help and check for arrow contact with the riser or rest; or even work on the technique.(I think I read that you were fairly new into archery)
    I am not advocating changing your arrows, but it is possible that others could straighten more quickly. I borrowed a friend's arrows when I was a beginner and they flew far better than my own.
    I hope this helps.
    All the best
    Geoff

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    In the Red
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    Thanks for that Geoff, the targets outside are the same as inside, so that would seem to discount the theory of different target materials. Flight wise they are flying well, so far as I can tell that is, my compound is wound upto around 54# and it doesnt leave much time for arrow spotting at twenty, or indeed thirty yards, however your comments are noted and maybe as I move the distances out, I might have chance to spot it, also will ask other members of the club their opinions, and will in due time let you know. Technique, well thats a good one I am still trying to replicate good form, on a repeatable shot by shot basis....lol cheers Geoff

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    In the Gold greydog's Avatar
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    Hi Zanda, I have seen the same thing though mainly with straw bosses, they can steer the arrow in at the last minute leaving it at a funny angle. It usually happens with ones that have been shot a bit and started to develop a few softer patches, it is probably magnified by the arrow flexing at close range, especially if you are shooting aluminiums with small to medium sized fletchings.

    That said, I've seen footage of carbon/aluminium arrows still flexing all the way out to 90m, so I wouldn't be too concerned if you are getting good groups

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    Outdoors on a calm day, a good way to "see" arrow flight is with binoculars. You ask a fellow archer to stand well back, behind you, with the bins to watch the arrows exit the bow. Because he/she is well back, the first few wiggles can be seen,magnified in the bins. You need to choose someone who knows what to look for.
    Good shooting
    Geoff

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    In the Gold Adam's Avatar
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    My guess is that you just need to do a bit of basic tuning. If the centreshot is off you'll see arrows misaligned left to right, and if the nocking point's at the wrong height it will effect them up and down. You'll notice it less outdoors because the fletching have time to do what they're supposed to do (i.e. stabilize the flight of the arrow).

    Adam

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