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Thread: Peep or no Peep

  1. #1
    In the White
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    Peep or no Peep


    can you shoot compound without a peep sight
    i have a peep sight at the moment I also use a kisser button
    as point of contact so does any one shoot with no peep sight

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  3. #2
    It's an X I've taken part in an AIUK Ironman Shoot.The Fonz Award.AIUK subscriber. bimble's Avatar
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    yes you can not use a peep... though you'll lose the benefits that the peep give you.
    Knowing is half the battle, the other half is violence

  4. #3
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    As Bimble says, you can shoot without one.
    When an archer starts with a compound as their first bow, the peep can be a distraction. During the early learning stages of shooting a compound, it is important to get used to the shot process of drawing to a solid anchor on the face; getting a good aim with the front sight; and not having to delay while the eye settles into the peep. Sometimes the peep turns in the last part of the draw and that is a real put off. Sometimes the peep is not well positioned and the temptation is to move the draw hand to get a good view through the peep or move the head to get a nice clean view.
    However, if you have made a good start without one, it is a good idea to try a peep for the benefits it brings. Some front sights with a lens need a peep to bring the target into better focus.

    I shoot with no peep. Mainly because my right eye is damaged and I have a sight in front of my left eye. A peep in front of my right eye just makes a mess of what I see at full draw.
    Recurve archers can easily out shoot me, and they manage without a peep. My aiming system is about the same as theirs so I should be better, in theory. I have a lot of let off and a release aid to help.

  5. #4
    In the Blue
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    Quote Originally Posted by geoffretired View Post
    Some front sights with a lens need a peep to bring the target into better focus.
    Interesting. So in these cases compound peeps are effectively rear aperture sights. A peep sight in rifle shooting is a simple hole you view the foresight through, but an aperture sight usually refers to a much smaller hole which acts as a lens, like in a pinhole camera. This has the effect of focusing both the foresight and the target when normally it's not possible to have both in sharp focus. Do some rear peeps incorporate an actual lens rather than just the simple aperture?

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    If the front sight has a lens, quite often it will give a blurred image. A small peep aperture acts like a pinhole camera in a way and helps clarify the view of the target. Some peeps have a larger aperture and a lens is fitted ( called a clarifier) to act alongside the front lens to give magnification that is clear. A bit like a simple telescope.

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    In the Gold chuffalump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geoffretired View Post
    Sometimes the peep is not well positioned and the temptation is to move the draw hand to get a good view.
    There are some archers and documents on the 'net that say that's exactly what you should do (Levi Morgan for example talks about setting his peep height differently depending on what ranges he'll be shooting). Then slight movements up and down when the front sight is at its extremes. Maybe because the eye is looking through the peep at a different angle at longer ranges, so the body of the peep obstructs the view of the sight ring?

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