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Discuss replacing steel cables for fastflight at the Compound Bow within Archery Interchange UK Forums; hello! I have an older bow (mid 90's) which I've recently replaced string (the wire ...
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    replacing steel cables for fastflight

    hello!

    I have an older bow (mid 90's) which I've recently replaced string (the wire you pull) of. Bow shoots much nicer now, especially with new alloy arrows (650 grn @ 70#, 30"). Really quiet .

    I've made some recurve strings before (shooting recurve +- 5 years), but never anything for compound. After seeing the proshop guy work on it, and some vids on youtube I think I might pull this off myself but I'm hoping for some advice from you as this is my first compound bow..

    I've made a schematic of how the cam system looks like:


    Yellow: string you pull; has been recently replaced; lower opacity is where its on the other side of the cam
    Green: where the cams are attached to the limbs
    Purple: center of cam; attaches cables on one side, string on the other
    Orange/Red: Cables

    I'm not sure if its a medium/hardcam (don't have shot any compounds before), or what cam system. Can someone clarify it for me?
    (I think its hardcam, dual cam, not sure thou).

    The main issue is how the cables are attached to the green 'things'. Here are some pictures:



    Is it possible to purchase something like this:

    so I can attach the string do that metal rod (green in picture)?

    P.S. The bow is a Golden Eagle 'Protech'.






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    It's an X Nightimer's Avatar
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    Tread very carefully before trying to change steel to fastflight.
    I was going to try it on a 1990 Firecat but the dealer warned me off.
    Steel believe it or not is a lot less punishing on limbs and riser than Fastflight.
    Limbs that are not designed for Fastflight could fail with terrible results.
    The stresses involved in a compound bow are considerable and if components are not up to the job you could be in real trouble.

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    hm.. what about putting more strands (22/24?)? Or the use of dacron? Don't like dacron though as I heard it keeps creeping... Then again, the steel wire hasn't been replaced since the making of the bow (1995- ish). Plastic wrapping around them looks okay thou.
    I guess the chances are bigger that the 16 year old steel wire is going to break than the limbs/riser due to modern materials. Any thoughts?

    Note: bow does not have any tear drop.

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    Compounds have to be "timed" so the cams stay in sync.
    Dacron stretches like knicker elastic so your timing would drift out as would your peep.
    Compound strings/cables are usually made under load to minimize stretch unlike a recurve string.
    As I said earlier these "early" bows were constructed for steel cables.
    I think Golden Eagle still make bows so why not e mail them to see if its a viable proposition.
    Please take care as an exploding compound can really spoil your day !!

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    Changing cams can seriously change the draw weight and draw length of the bow.I have changed steel for fastflight before,but I used the same cams.
    I have changed cams before, too, but was not happy with the weight or draw length afterwards. Cams that are different shapes can have very different effects when fitted.
    It is possible to get the right information from a manufacturer sometimes, especially if you are changing their cams for others of theirs that were designed for your bow.
    From your picture it looks like the new cams would never have been designed for your bow; they may be from a different make of bow, so no one would have the charts to work from.
    In the past, I would have wanted to do what you want to do. Looking at your situation from where I am now, I think there are too many things that are unlikely to match, to make it worthwhile.You might make several strings and cables before they were the right lengths. You might find after all the work, the weight is far too high or far too low; or the draw length was too long/short.
    I would go for changing the steel cables for fastflight ones, using the same cams.Fit the little plastic pulley that you see on the axle on the last photo, inside the limb fork of your bow. Fit the loop of the cable round that pulley before sliding the axle through.The other end of the steel cable has a metal blob on the end I think, That fits into a round cut away in the cam, if I remember correctly.That is difficult to duplicate for a fastflight string.I think my cams had a spare peg for the bow string, so I drilled through the cam from the cable side to the string side and used the spare peg to attach the cable; having made a loop at that end to fit over.I had to round over all the corners that the cable would pass over so nothing could cut the string material.I made the cables a bit longer as the end had further to reach to get to the pegs.

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    I would get it de-strung and left that way (left in a loft long enough it will explode usually the bow bag stops it going everywhere) - not worth the bother, trip to casualty or worse for the sake of a few quid.

    I am sometimes worried at the lack of maintenance on newer bows so I am certainly not happy shooting along side somebody with a bodged bow under high tension.




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