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Discuss The danger of over doing it at the General Archery Discussion & News within Archery Interchange Forums; This week I have learned a valuable lesson. When people say “to get good you ...
  1. #1
    In the Blue
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    The danger of over doing it

    This week I have learned a valuable lesson.

    When people say “to get good you need to shoot a lot of arrows”, there is a limit and that is your conditioning.

    Sunday just gone the 3 of us in my little group had the field to our self as most of our club are hiding indoors, and as it’s not that could yet we are sticking it out as long as possible before we join them.

    Because of this we were able to spread out and shoot at our own pace, from which I shot about 200 arrows, at the end of it I felt fine.
    However when I came to shoot yesterday I was a mess, the draw weight felt Twice as heavy as it is, I could not steady my am and my anchor felt wrong even though it was the same as always, I hit my bracer a lot and had zero consistency.

    It really made the scratch my head, as after checking my bow all was as it should be that end, I went so far as re waxing my string. I just could not work out why.

    Today I spoke to Nicky Hunt via Facebook as until recently she was our club president, for some advice, after explaining everything she thinks it’s Down to fatigue as I shot 75% - 100% more arrows than normal so I need to slow down and take it easy until I next shoot and during.

    Lesson learned, next time I’ll take more brakes and shoot a bit less when my shoot days will be close together, and I can shoot at my own pace.





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    In the Gold Corax67's Avatar
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    I think it sounds like fatigue too.

    You've probably done the archery equivalent of running a half marathon when previously you only did a 5k park run and now you are feeling the pain. Even the archers shooting the magical 200-300 arrows a day worked up to that figure and I have seen a number of interviews where, following a layoff or injury recovery, saw archers engaging in a staged return to build up their muscle strength and stamina.

    Take things easy for the next few sessions and shoot some short rounds and you should soon be back to normal.




    Karl
    I meant to do that - honest ! !

  4. #3
    It's an X AIUK subscriber. Rik's Avatar
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    Just remembering the first fencing tournament I went to, in college...
    I was tired at the end of the day - expected. What I didn't expect was to struggle with walking up steps the next morning! I mean I'd only done about 3 or 4 times more than I'd usually do in a day...
    Ever tried? Ever failed?
    Try again. Fail again. Fail better! - Beckett

    The marksman who hesitates is lost. Just take it for granted that you are going to hit and fire away before you have time to doubt the certainty of success. - Annie Oakley, 1894.

  5. #4
    In the White
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    Theres a tendency when you go to the golf range to just 'ball bash' after a while and not concentrate on something to work on, which is exactly what can happen at archery (i dont know what the archery equivalent of ball bashing is lol but you get the idea). its better to have more shorter intensive spells working on things to improve, but archery is so addictive you think 'just another end' and before you know it your arms are hanging off. having said that, getting used to shooting a lot of arrows can help conditioning if you intend to shoot FITA's and Yorks, or to just enjoy a long day, so i reckon that when you recognise your performance is dipping and you start to feel tired it's time to stop for the day

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    In the Red AIUK subscriber. Kernowlad's Avatar
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    Not the same but it has parallels - once I realised I was naturally quite a good runner and cyclists, I trained my butt off in my mid 30s. Every day sometimes even twice a day; the results got better but... I then completely broke my immune system and was almost constantly ill for a year.

    So while I still train hard, I have a day on day off policy. In running and weights you learn that rest time is actually as important as the exercise itself and with archery you are doing a repetitive, muscle heavy motion; no rest time is going to equal problems. Even in my short archery time, I can feel I've pushed it a bit far a few times.

    My fastest runs are usually after a spell of doing something else.
    Mybo Origin

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    Meany good points raised here.

    Yes it is very easy to say “just one more end” and that’s pretty much what I did, much like when I was cycling and said just one more lap.

    As we had the whole field to ourselves we could just shoot and collect as we was very spaced out on the field so it was safe to do so, which ended up with me shooting much more than if I had to follow the rules and wait until everybody was done, which slows down the pace a lot and I end shooting less per session which in hindsight is a good thing.

    kernowlad, I’ve been there when I was cycling, I’ve seen the lights more than once at the end of a race and ended up ill afterwards, it’s a easy trap to fall into. Pushing your body to its limits can feel good when the endorphins are flowing but it can also be bad for you.

    I think I will start focusing on an element of my form each time like what has been advised here, starting with my anchor and release, as I have a habit of over drawing and screwing up my release, which in its self harms my consistency. As I’m not useing a clicker it’s very easy to do, so I think I’ll add a clicker soon, even just to help avoid the above problem.

    I’m at the range this afternoon, just the 3 of us again, I will be taking it easy, more tea brakes, and just focus on my form rather than the “shoot a lot to get good” philosophy I have used, I think 60 arrows ish should be enough.

    The problem is everything I have been told or read reinforces that mind set so it was a very easy trap to fall into.

    I’ll let you all know how it went when I get back.

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