CLICK TO REGISTER FOR THE AIUK IRONMAN
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 6 of 17
Like Tree4Likes
Discuss stabilisation at the General Archery Discussion & News within Archery Interchange Forums; hi guys i was wondering how to check that a recurve bow with stabilisers is ...
  1. #1
    In the Green
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    stabilisation

    hi guys i was wondering how to check that a recurve bow with stabilisers is balanced or not as im trying to find the perfect balace for mine and dont know what to do





  2. Advertisements like those above are essential to keep AIUK running. If you'd like to remove the Google and Ebay adverts and help us meet our running costs, please consider subscribing for only 1.50 per month. Thank you!
     

  3. #2
    It's an X AIUK subscriber. Timid Toad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,594
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 208 Times in 187 Posts
    There is no perfect balance really, it's mostly personal preference.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so." Douglas Adams

  4. #3
    In the Green
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    ok but is there a basic starting point or do i just play arround and see what happens ?

  5. #4
    It's an X
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Poole uk
    Posts
    20,189
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1,003 Times in 859 Posts
    Checking the balance of a bow can be done in several ways. One is to hang the bow from the nocking point and imagine a vertical line hanging from the nocking point. You might draw a sketch of the bow in that position with the imaginary line drawn on.
    Then hang the bow from one limb tip and imagine a vertical line hanging down from the limb tip. Then turn round your sketch to match the new position and draw the new vertical line on the sketch. Those two vertical lines will cross somewhere and often they cross just in front of the riser and just below the grip. That doesn't mean the bow is "perfectly balanced" it just shows where it is balanced. Some archers might experiment to see what happens if they move the balance point further forwards, and see if their groups get better.( more weight on the log rod would move the balance forwards. Less weight at the back would do a similar thing.) Some archers want to see the long rod with no jumping up during the shot, so add weights to the long rod till the long rod hardly moves during the shot; until it rolls forwards that is.
    The balance point isn't the only thing to get sorted however. The total weight on the bow can make a difference to your shooting. Too much weight can have a great balance point, but cause you to struggle at full draw and shoot badly as a result.

  6. #5
    It's an X
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Poole uk
    Posts
    20,189
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1,003 Times in 859 Posts
    Checking the balance of a bow can be done in several ways. One is to hang the bow from the nocking point and imagine a vertical line hanging from the nocking point. You might draw a sketch of the bow in that position with the imaginary line drawn on.
    Then hang the bow from one limb tip and imagine a vertical line hanging down from the limb tip. Then turn round your sketch to match the new position and draw the new vertical line on the sketch. Those two vertical lines will cross somewhere and often they cross just in front of the riser and just below the grip. That doesn't mean the bow is "perfectly balanced" it just shows where it is balanced. Some archers might experiment to see what happens if they move the balance point further forwards, and see if their groups get better.( more weight on the log rod would move the balance forwards. Less weight at the back would do a similar thing.) Some archers want to see the long rod with no jumping up during the shot, so add weights to the long rod till the long rod hardly moves during the shot; until it rolls forwards that is.
    The balance point isn't the only thing to get sorted however. The total weight on the bow can make a difference to your shooting. Too much weight can have a great balance point, but cause you to struggle at full draw and shoot badly as a result.
    fbirder likes this.

  7. #6
    It's an X AIUK subscriber. Rik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Carrickfergus
    Posts
    4,605
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 345 Times in 314 Posts
    My quick and dirty approach:
    Place a finger on the back of the bow opposite the grip, long rod hanging down: it should balance level with or below your normal pressure point on the grip.
    Then turn the bow upside down and place a finger underneath the extension or long rod. It should balance an inch or so forward of the stabiliser bushing.
    So the centre of mass is slightly forward and slightly down...
    lbp121 and fbirder like this.
    Ever tried? Ever failed?
    Try again. Fail again. Fail better! - Beckett

    The marksman who hesitates is lost. Just take it for granted that you are going to hit and fire away before you have time to doubt the certainty of success. - Annie Oakley, 1894.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Stabilisation
    By ianB in forum Target Archery
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 05-08-17, 09:30 AM
  2. [COMPOUND] Stabilisation
    By Liam Hobbs in forum Stabilisers & Sticky-Out Bits
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 26-05-14, 07:54 PM
  3. Stabilisation question
    By mikearky in forum Recurve Bow
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 22-09-13, 12:43 AM
  4. Stabilisation
    By bell&antelope in forum Compound Bow
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: 10-04-12, 11:07 AM
  5. Changes to stabilisation
    By Neo in forum Compound Bow
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-12-11, 10:34 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •