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Thread: Coaching Compounders

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    In the Blue StevoNilo's Avatar
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    Coaching Compounders

    Hi,
    I have 3 decades shooting experience with recurve and I enjoy sharing my knowledge with newbie shooters in my club. However there are a couple of compounders that I would like to help too. Even if it's just observing them, are the principles of recurve similar to compound?
    Thanks

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    It's an X KidCurry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevoNilo View Post
    Hi,
    I have 3 decades shooting experience with recurve and I enjoy sharing my knowledge with newbie shooters in my club. However there are a couple of compounders that I would like to help too. Even if it's just observing them, are the principles of recurve similar to compound?
    Thanks
    Yes and no. In some respects they are similar and some aspects they are very different. I would say if you are asking this question you probably don't know enough about compound archery to coach it with a degree of confidence. For example, could you do a compound bow setup safely for a beginner or identify bow setup issues over form issues?
    An archers only opponent is his mind.

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    I would say there are lots of similarities and there are some differences worth noting.
    With a short BH on a compound and a high initial draw weight from the start, the compounder will almost certainly be unable to start the draw in the same posture as the recurver. With a KSLee way of shooting recurve, the draw hand comes up from rest, more or less vertically from the waist and stays close to the body, with the shoulders more or less in line with the gold all the time.
    A compounder would find that difficult as the string would be out of reach unless the shoulders were opened to face the target. Many will open the shoulders and raise the bow and bow hand to about eye level, but the start of the draw will looked rather like a cramped up recurver, until the let off arrives and things fall into place.
    With the draw hand, usually a reverse of the recurve, ( back of hand towards the side of the face) and a release aid in there too, the bow is drawn to the front of the chin even if the hand settles further back.
    Aiming for a compounder normally takes longer as they try to settle the front sight, the level bubble, the peep sight in relation to the front sight. The low holding weight allows them the extra time needed to settle those things into place.... but some will creep forwards and the wheels can be seen to be rolling back the way they came. That is one reason for mentioning a good strong pull against the stops rather than just enough to get there, then forget.
    The execution or finishing of the shot can seem very different from recurve, but as they improve things start to happen in almost the same way. Just as a recurve archer with a clicker will learn to draw and pull through the clicker, and release, almost as if the clicker wasn't there; so the compounder can draw and settle and continue to pull until it seems the release aid has gone off on its own.
    But getting to that stage has to be worked on. Just as recurve archers sometimes stop when the clicker goes and then release afterwards, in two stages; so the new compounder, may get ready to activate the trigger and stop drawing.
    Compound archers activate the trigger in three main ways, often by choice and sometimes by mistake.
    Some hit the trigger and usually have stopped pulling just before that. The shot can be pushed off line by that method and very few will advise using it.
    Another method is to pull hard and let the hand move back slightly so the trigger is moved gradually by the thumb being pressed onto it.
    Others pull harder and squeeze the hand as if trying to prevent the hand from being pulled away. That is gradual and the thumb gets pressed against the trigger as all the hand curls up (fingers and thumb).
    Those two methods can produce a surprise release as the archer is not sure of the exact point when the trigger will go off.
    Another version, is to choose the moment and activate the trigger, but not as a stab or punch. It is almost like it happened on its own but at a time chosen by the archer. It is Command shooting.
    One type of release aid has no trigger so the archer, at full draw and on aim, increases the pull and the release aid breaks open. There will be a safety trigger to prevent it opening as the draw reaches peak weight.
    One thing to look out for is the draw length setting of the bow. Sometimes it is too long for the archer. They are fully extended, or perhaps over extended when on aim and find holding a bit of a struggle. The wheels may start to rotate back the way they came, as a sign of that struggle. I mentioned wheels going the wrong way, earlier; but in that situation it isn't necessarily a bow set too long, just the archer forgetting to keep the tension on the string.

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    Hi Kid Curry, I suspect that quite a few compounders get help from recurve archers who have been in archery a few years but don't shoot compound or know much about them.
    When I started on compound there were no other options.
    I think that StevoNilo wants to be of some help; possibly just by observing as he suggests.
    The fact that he came on here to find out how he might make a better job of that, is a good idea, I feel.
    The level of the compounders needs to be considered by Stevo. But perhaps he has already done that, and feels they are new enough to need some initial help, rather than being left to get on, on their own.
    I feel it is a " Where do I go from here, situation."

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    In the Blue StevoNilo's Avatar
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    Thanks very much Geoff.. I will reread all your points a bit later on.. but yes I do want to help them because I know that an external observer is invaluable. When you are the archer then you are so wrapped up in the shot you are not really aware of other form issues. I do want to know more about compound shooting so I will read some more and talk to the more experienced compound shooters. I think there are 3 Compounders at our club and there may be more. We are mainly recurve with a few barebow shooters.
    S.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KidCurry View Post
    Yes and no. In some respects they are similar and some aspects they are very different. I would say if you are asking this question you probably don't know enough about compound archery to coach it with a degree of confidence. For example, could you do a compound bow setup safely for a beginner or identify bow setup issues over form issues?
    Hi KidC, Thanks for taking the time to reply. I dont really want to run before I can walk. I dont know enough about tampering with a compound, but eventually yes maybe. First and foremost I want to identify good compound form, and what are the bad habits that can creep in, just like in recurve. If I can give them good observations then my work is mostly done.
    S.

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