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Discuss A Different Approach to Bareshaft tuning at the Methodology, Tuning, Coaching etc. within Archery Interchange UK Forums; I have been thinking (bad habit I know) about what we are trying to do ...
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    Red face A Different Approach to Bareshaft tuning

    I have been thinking (bad habit I know) about what we are trying to do when bare shaft tunning and wondering whether we have the methodology right.
    As I understand it whatwe want from tuning (as a middling level archer) is to have a setup which is maximally forgiving of a poor shot.
    In this case, would it not be better to shoot say 4 or 5 bareshafts, amd just one or two fletched shafts. Tuning is then adjusted to minimise the group size of the bare shafts - and especially to bring outliers back into the group. The fletched shafts are there just to give a clue as to which way to make adjustments.
    By shooting more bareshafts per end the cances of getting some poorer shots among them are increased and the bow's tolerance to those poorer shots is whatwe are trying to reduce.
    I must admit I haven't tried this yet, but would be interested in comments on the suggestion.






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    It's an X buzz lite beer's Avatar
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    Initially when setting up, I believe it is appropriate and not uncommon to shoot all your arrows in bare shaft form and select only the shafts that group together for tuning purposes, from these arrows fletch at least three then proceed with your tuning. Both physically and dynamically a bare shaft is a different arrow than a fletched arrow, Fletchings slow an arrow down and make them heavier and alter apparent stiffness, a bare shaft tune only gets you near to a truly forgiving set up . For the most optimal set up you must follow a regimented micro adjustment process of all other variables to get best groups at all distances.

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    Moving on from the previous post.

    Some archers, (either sponsored or with spare cash), get a couple of dozen arrows (sometimes more!), shoot them all bare shaft, and select only the arrows from these which group as the set to tune and use in competition.

    The others are relagated to training arrows (bare bossing etc). Although it is worth checking these arrows by rotating nocks etc. as there may be some variation due to the components rather than the shafts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fugue View Post
    Moving on from the previous post.

    Some archers, (either sponsored or with spare cash), get a couple of dozen arrows (sometimes more!), shoot them all bare shaft, and select only the arrows from these which group as the set to tune and use in competition.

    The others are relagated to training arrows (bare bossing etc). Although it is worth checking these arrows by rotating nocks etc. as there may be some variation due to the components rather than the shafts.
    Rotating nocks is well worth trying, shoot at 40 yds. Mark line on arrow and knocks to set starting position. Rotate knocks (very slightly) of arrows which do not group. If arrows come closer to group move a bit more, if wider move knock the other way.
    Rotating knocks works due to the inconsistency of the carbon thickness on arrows. Aluminum can be consistently be manufactured to very fine tolerances. Unfortunately no one has yet devised a way of wrapping on carbon to the same accuracy. If you look at an arrow end through a micro scope the carbon wall will vary in thickness.
    I think therefore I miss

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    BowSurfer, I think I can see what you are getting at. Tuning out the bow's intolerance with bare shafts seems like a good idea as they tend to spread wider than fletched ones.I think though that there are two things going on here.
    Using bare shafts really indicates the whether or not the nocking point is close to ideal and how well the spine matches the speed of the bow.Once you have decided where the nocking point is going to be and once you have matched the arrows to the bow( or even adjusted the speed of the bow to the arrows)then the fine tuning starts.If you did the fine tuning in relation to the bare shafts, I'm not sure that you would get the benefits when you start shooting fletched arrows. I can see the reasoning, I think. If the tweaking brings the spaced out bare shafts into a nice group it should do something good for the fletched ones.
    That may be correct, but the bare shafts are slightly stiffer than the fletched version, (or is it the other way round) and perhaps that will undo the benefits of some of the tweaking.
    Perhaps we should use more bare shafts to accentuate our mistakes.That way we may learn what causes some of the misses and work at reducing the errors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by geoffretired View Post
    BowSurfer, I think I can see what you are getting at. Tuning out the bow's intolerance with bare shafts seems like a good idea as they tend to spread wider than fletched ones.I think though that there are two things going on here.
    Using bare shafts really indicates the whether or not the nocking point is close to ideal and how well the spine matches the speed of the bow.Once you have decided where the nocking point is going to be and once you have matched the arrows to the bow( or even adjusted the speed of the bow to the arrows)then the fine tuning starts.If you did the fine tuning in relation to the bare shafts, I'm not sure that you would get the benefits when you start shooting fletched arrows. I can see the reasoning, I think. If the tweaking brings the spaced out bare shafts into a nice group it should do something good for the fletched ones.
    That may be correct, but the bare shafts are slightly stiffer than the fletched version, (or is it the other way round) and perhaps that will undo the benefits of some of the tweaking.
    Perhaps we should use more bare shafts to accentuate our mistakes.That way we may learn what causes some of the misses and work at reducing the errors.
    I agree that there will still be need for fine tuning. However I am not sure that the initial bare shaft tuning is just related to nocking point adjustment. The texts usually advocate setting button pressure using bare shafts at 15-20yds, and it is this phase of tuning that I was thinking of. The fine tuning is then continued at greater distances, and is done by group sizes more than a reliance on the position of the bare shaft. After that micro tuning is good if you can get small enough groups at 60-70yds or more.




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