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Thread: Double Sight Image.

  1. #1
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    Double Sight Image.

    Shooting recurve with both eyes open I see two sight ring images. Being right eye dominant (checked) I have read that I should use the left image to aim with. However. If I use the left image, which is also higher than the right one, the arrow misses the 70m boss to the right. If I use the right image I get scoring arrows! I have just started using spectacles for shooting - but the bridge of the frame gets in the way of my sighting vision. So I cannot use spectacles for shooting. I wondered about the location of my sight ring. Currently it aligns with the centre of the limbs and the arrow, which aligns with the centre of the long-rod. I would have to bring it much closer, and out of alignment with the arrow, to the riser. So I have two questions. 1. Should I be using the left image? 2. Am I not turning my head far enough. I have seen images of recurve shooters not looking over the bridge of their nose when aiming. Maybe by anchor reference points 'string touches end of nose and centre of chin' are not correct! Any suggestions?

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  3. #2
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    I would start again on this rather than trying to sort out an issue that could be caused by something that might be being overlooked.
    I would set the bow up first as that can be put back to where it is now, if needs be. Most recurves are set up so the arrow is a bit left of the string when the string lines up down the centre of the limbs. The sight is then set up above the arrow (or left of the string; which will be the same place). All that assumes that the right eye, when aiming, will see the string blur to the right of the sight aperture... meaning that the string is in line with the centre of the bow limbs again.
    If you adjust the bow to that set up, and aim the bow with only the right eye open ( just as a check for now) you can shoot some arrows at short range to see where they land. If that looks OK try longer distances.
    You may find, when you first try at short range, that the string line is not touching the right hand side of the sight ring. I would then consider where the string is touching your chin. Most right handed archers get the string off to the right of the centre of their chin.
    If you stand in front of a mirror, as if the mirror was the target, and you adopt a normal stance and posture, you can see how the head turning affects what you see. Turn your head just enough so that you can see the tip of your nose appears directly under your right eye. Imagine the string line going from the pupil of the right eye, vertically down to the tip of your nose, and continuing vertically down to your chin. You will see where on the chin, that string line would contact your chin.( probably not the centre.)
    You can also observe where your nose bridge is, in relation to the string line, and with glasses on, discover what is getting in the way... if anything.

    The left image is the correct one with both eyes open, but the string line, in relation to the aiming eye, has a massive effect on where the arrows land( left to right)
    With the string contacting the centre of your chin, there s a good chance the bow is not lined up facing the target, even if the sight shows it is.

    Further to what I said; if you stand in front of the mirror facing it as normal. Then hold something like a pencil up to the tip of your nose and down to the centre of your chin,to represent a string line. you will see the right eye is no where near the pencil. If you maintain the centre chin and tip of nose contact while turning your head as if to aim a bow, you will see the nose tip move to the right and appear under your right eye. You will also see that the pencil is now well off vertical. Indicating a canted bow.

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    Hello Geoff. Thanks for the reply. The bow is set-up as you indicated (limb centres etc) and the centreshot just left of string. I do see the string picture blur in line with my riser. The anchor position I currently use is described in the book 'Archery:Steps to success'. However I think like all suggestions it is intended for 'perfect' form etc. I know I have arthritis in my neck and it limits the amount of rotational movement I can use (leftward). Maybe the answer is simply to find, as you suggested, an alternative anchor location. I will give your suggestion of using a mirror a try and see what results. It is a PITA to have to keep removing my specs when approaching the shooting line and then having to replace them to fill-in my score card!

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    So using the "right image" you hit the target and using the "left image" you miss, just means you have set the sight (possibly inadvertently) using the left eye. The fact you can actually "see two sight ring images" and can actively choose which one to use for sighting suggests to me that (like me) you don't have a strong eye dominance, despite the test(s). The typical dominance tests are not very reliable or accurate except for people with strong dominance and I think they can be a bit of a red herring.

    The fact you don't turn your head much suggests a cause. Assuming you're a right handed archer not turning your head much means the left eye is much more easily able to see the sight picture, and your nose is almost in the way of the right eye. This would also tally with the bridge of your spectacles interfering with the sight picture through your right eye.

    It's not wrong to shoot right handed and aim with the left eye, but if your sighting eye is not aligned with your string picture you may encounter issues of an apparent "drift" as the arrow would probably impact further left as the target distance increases. Ideally as a right handed archer you would use your right eye to sight on the pin, and this would be aligned with the string.

    If you struggle to turn your head more you could try opening your stance a little more instead. This will have the effect turning your body a little more toward the target rather than your head.

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    Thanks for the reply. I have just tried Geoffs viewing in a mirror suggestion. I viewed my image without any specs and it was as I have described. However. When I tried it with my specs on the left eye immediately became dominant and only 1 sight ring image! I have previously tried opening my stance to reduce neck strain - but it did not cure the problem. I am have to sit down and think through what is happening with the specs-on.

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    I have had to work through this: I was right eye dominant and am now left. (Don't ask). I used to slightly squint the left eye to help the right one out. But if the sun was slanting in from the wrong direction I'd squint the wrong eye and a miss would ensue. So now I just shut the damn left eye. Not ideal I know, but better that than throwing away points.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so." Douglas Adams

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