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Thread: Clubs with members of more than one association.

  1. #13
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    A non AGB club has to be exactly that. Since AGB require that ALL members of an AGB club are members of AGB then if SOME members of an "own insurance" club want to be AGB members (to go to shoot elsewhere, or take part in AGB organised events), they'd have to go down the AGB Direct route, as you can't have an AGB club where SOME members are AGB and some arent.

  2. #14
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    Also, you've got to be careful about insurance.
    When I joined the club that I belong to now, I was told that they had their own insurance. After a burglary, we discovered that not only did the so called insurance not cover the contents of the range that had been stolen, there wasnt actually any 3rd party liability or any member to member cover. We held an emergency EGM, went AGB a week later and got some proper contents cover too.
    Amazing how the prospect of losing your life savings, house and car motivates people.
    As a member of a club without adequate insurance, you could be held liable if the club were successfully sued.

  3. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ben tarrow View Post
    As a member of a club without adequate insurance, you could be held liable if the club were successfully sued.
    As a member of a club without adequate insurance, and if the club were successfully sued, your liability is limited to payment of your subscriptions.
    As a committee member of a club without adequate insurance, you could be held liable if the club were successfully sued.
    As a member of a club without adequate insurance, you would be held personally liable if you were successfully sued. Which could be the case if it was you who caused the damage to another member.

  4. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR View Post
    As a member of a club without adequate insurance, and if the club were successfully sued, your liability is limited to payment of your subscriptions.
    I'm going to have to disagree with you on that one.
    Your liability wouldnt be limited in any way, unless the club was a limited company.
    Go check with a legal person if you dont believe me.
    I did when I investigated making our club a company limited by guarantee. Its scary really.

    A club is just a collection of people. It has no standing as a legal entity in its own right. Therefore, if you sue the club, you are suing the members

  5. #17
    In the Red I've taken part in an AIUK American Shoot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ben tarrow View Post
    I'm going to have to disagree with you on that one.
    Your liability wouldnt be limited in any way, unless the club was a limited company.
    Go check with a legal person if you dont believe me.
    I did when I investigated making our club a company limited by guarantee. Its scary really.

    A club is just a collection of people. It has no standing as a legal entity in its own right. Therefore, if you sue the club, you are suing the members
    I refer you to Ashton & Reid on Clubs and Associations, the leading guide on this subject. (Quoting from second edition 2011.) From para 1.10 "It is generally well known, and one of its major attractions, that in an unincorporated members' club the liability of the individual member is limited to his entrance fee (if any) and his subscriptions." References are given.
    From para 1.11 "On the other hand, the responsibility for transactions and activities carried on by the club rests normally with the managing committee. It is they to whom creditors or injured persons will look for payment of the club's debts or compensation for injuries suffered on club premises. This may have severe financial consequences for the members of the club who are also members of the committee and may be seen as a serious disadvantage of an unincorporated members club."

    So, as I said above:
    "As a member of a club without adequate insurance, and if the club were successfully sued, your liability is limited to payment of your subscriptions.
    As a committee member of a club without adequate insurance, you could be held liable if the club were successfully sued."

    Any advice you received to become a limited company relates to protection of committee members, not to members in general to whom it makes no difference. Whether a limited company is the most appropriate means of protecting committee members is another question.

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  7. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR View Post
    I refer you to Ashton & Reid on Clubs and Associations, the leading guide on this subject. (Quoting from second edition 2011.) From para 1.10 "It is generally well known, and one of its major attractions, that in an unincorporated members' club the liability of the individual member is limited to his entrance fee (if any) and his subscriptions." References are given.
    From para 1.11 "On the other hand, the responsibility for transactions and activities carried on by the club rests normally with the managing committee. It is they to whom creditors or injured persons will look for payment of the club's debts or compensation for injuries suffered on club premises. This may have severe financial consequences for the members of the club who are also members of the committee and may be seen as a serious disadvantage of an unincorporated members club."

    So, as I said above:
    "As a member of a club without adequate insurance, and if the club were successfully sued, your liability is limited to payment of your subscriptions.
    As a committee member of a club without adequate insurance, you could be held liable if the club were successfully sued."

    Any advice you received to become a limited company relates to protection of committee members, not to members in general to whom it makes no difference. Whether a limited company is the most appropriate means of protecting committee members is another question.
    Fair enough. Your argument is compelling. I was only able to repeat what I was told, since this is not my area of expertise. Thank you

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