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Thread: Cheaper compound spares

  1. #43
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    Two posts is enough for a string jig. Adjustable for different lengths obviously, but the four posts for end servings aren't necessary.
    To serve the ends all you need is a piece of wood with a notch cut in each end( or two pieces if you want the luxury version) about six inches long to put between the two sets of strands after winding them on. You can then serve the ends between the two pieces of wood. The wood simply gives you room the use the serving tool.

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  3. #44
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    Found a bit of unistrut at work that I can legitimately call scrap. Some 10 x 40 steel floor track for the swivelling post mounts and some M14 bolts for posts. Drill/tap the hex end for M8 and there's the wrapping pegs.

    Not sure if I should design change though. There seems to be an ArcheryTalk design that combines tensioning and fabrication into one. The guy used long tag ends of the string material to serve round the loops. While it was on the pegs. Neat. Don't know if it's as robust as proper serving material though.

  4. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuffalump View Post
    Found a bit of unistrut at work that I can legitimately call scrap. Some 10 x 40 steel floor track for the swivelling post mounts and some M14 bolts for posts. Drill/tap the hex end for M8 and there's the wrapping pegs.

    Not sure if I should design change though. There seems to be an ArcheryTalk design that combines tensioning and fabrication into one. The guy used long tag ends of the string material to serve round the loops. While it was on the pegs. Neat. Don't know if it's as robust as proper serving material though.
    I can attest that doing “tag-end” serving for compounds is as robust and resistant to undoing as fully served loops.. I still do full served loops for recurves/longbows, but that’s because the loops are in a wearing position, as opposed to the studs that compound loops are attached to.

    With a bit of practice the tag end loops look as good or better than many professionally done served loops

    (I mainly make strings for other people’s bows, it started making recurve strings, then a few compound sets for myself...)

    Picture is a sample string to show colours, but done using tag-end

    T


  5. #46
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    I serve loops with tag ends of the bowstring. Very neat job and no bulges.where they join the end serving.
    I made a stretching frame, like a long picture frame 6 feet long and 18" wide. The string is held on two J bolts one at each end. I could wind the string onto those in order to start making the string.The advantage is, if I turn one J bolt to put twists in, as the string twist, it shortens and therefore adds tension at the same time. It is then very stiff and by rubbing the string with a piece of cord wrapped round one turn, the strands all bed in tightly and look like a single strand.

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  7. #47
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    Well the beauty of unistrut is that I could make various attachments and swap them out as required. Might even be able to make a bow press, although they tend to be string up so you need more clearance. Maybe sideways mounted.

    Gonna need a fair few zebedees 😁

  8. #48
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    I wouldn't recommend derailing your compound but, if you do, it's a great way to get rid of the awe and timidness associated with the mechanical side of the bow.

    I still don't know for sure how I did it but I managed to flip the string off the cams two ends from completing a 50 yd 252. Probably dry fired it but the surprise wiped my short term memory so I can't remember if I was on my first arrow of the end (in the gold) or second (in the quiver).

    The club has a bow press so carefully compressing the limbs and refitting the string was a doddle. Visual limb check clear. A carefully draw cycle and let down revealed no odd sounds. Removed the rattling sight and shot an end. Nice thunk. All of a sudden the thoughts of messing up cam timings or doing something odd to the string when adjusting or changing a peep vanished. It's not that mysterious and if you have the equipment, not that difficult and pretty interesting.

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