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Thread: Nocking Point Tuning

  1. #7
    It's an X AIUK subscriber. Rik's Avatar
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    The whole "patterns" thing in walkback is bunk, I believe. The two traditional methods read the patterns exactly opposite to each other. Both will work... Why? Because button pressure and position adjustments are interchangeable, so far as walkback is concerned...
    At basis, all it says is "your arrows are flying left/right, adjust the position/pressure to change that".
    The problem with trying to read patterns is that you never actually get a, straight line, unless it's vertical. Anything else is just a curve of some sort (though sometimes a shallow one).

    And of course, none of it works unless you've got the sight set in the plane of the bow (and everything aligned), because otherwise you're just setting up for a false reading. That's probably the major cause of people thinking you can get "curve back in or across" patterns - alignment was wrong to start with.

    So there's no magic to walkback, no patterns to read, no analysis. If things are out of line, adjust them back in.
    Ever tried? Ever failed?
    Try again. Fail again. Fail better! - Beckett

    The marksman who hesitates is lost. Just take it for granted that you are going to hit and fire away before you have time to doubt the certainty of success. - Annie Oakley, 1894.

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  3. #8
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    Ben, I think this is a very important post that you have made. I agree with you about misinformation. It is a tricky area because the mistakes are often put about by very experienced archers. They ( or I when it is my mistake) aren't aware of their / our mistakes. So many aspects can seem to be correctly stated, as many examples seem to support the thinking.The paper test is a good example of what I mean. If the bow is a compound, a bullet hole is possible. It is easy enough to imagine it works for other bow types. I have managed near bullet holes. I can believe easily enough that the imperfection is just my shooting and with a bit more work it will happen eventually.
    I believe that it is discussions like this one that can clarify the thinking.No one under pressure to be proved right or no one feeling they have to defend what they believe is right, for their pride's sake.
    Another example is the curved flight you mentioned. How can that be? I think Joe Tapley explained it some time ago.From what I remember it wasn' t a curved flight that produced the curve in the landing positions, it was the way the flexing and fishtailing during the first few yards was affecting the landing positions of the points. I think there was also the misunderstanding in " curved flight" . A wiggly line of arrows that happens during a walk back can be called curved, but it is very different in reality from a single curve.

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    Rik, just seen your post after typing mine. That is nice and clear.

  5. #10
    In the Gold
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    but so many "diagrams" of what to expect in walkback tuning dont show a "wiggly" line, they show a beautiful curve with the top and bottom of the curve on the midline of the target, and the furthest extremity of the curve approx half way to the edge of the boss (from the midline)

    Not wishing to pick on any one in particular, but http://tenzone.org.uk/Equipment/tuni...s/tuning01.pdf was the first one I came across that shows this.
    Mind you, I had to grin at the disclaimer:
    NOTE: The patterns above are indicative only, and follow the majority of texts.

    In otherwords, we're only saying this because everyone else says it

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    Yes, the smooth curve is shown but many archers get the wiggly line and assume they are at fault, so keep trying till they get something like the diagram.
    It is the way the documents present their case that gives the readers a sense of security. The document is correct, I must get that to happen.
    In the same sort of way, and experienced archer is considered to be correct so they go away and try to get the results they were told they should get.
    In the days before internet, the words of the experienced archers could be taken as gospel with no way of finding out if they were right.
    I am not knocking anyone here. This is just a comment on a situation, not a judgement. I guess many of us have passed on things we believed only to find out later that our sources were wrong.

  7. #12
    It's an X AIUK subscriber. Rik's Avatar
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    Heh. I'd poke Steve about that (if I'd spoken to him in years <looks around guiltily>)...
    The closest patterns to "real life" would probably be 3, a and b... If your arrows are basically flying straight but at an angle from the plane of the bow, then as you move back, they drop faster down and the net result is a kind of curve towards the vertical. You need to be pretty consistent to see it though. Mostly, what we produce is something which only fits a pattern by chance, or if you squint a lot and look out the corner of your eye. Overall left and right movements are generally spottable though.
    Ever tried? Ever failed?
    Try again. Fail again. Fail better! - Beckett

    The marksman who hesitates is lost. Just take it for granted that you are going to hit and fire away before you have time to doubt the certainty of success. - Annie Oakley, 1894.

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