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Thread: Making Barrelled Arrows Jig

  1. #7
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    I have been thinking some more on this idea and think that it depends on perfectly even shavings being taken off all round the shaft, and on every lap from start to finish. Otherwise, you get a taper but it may not be concentric to the long axis. I am thinking that the part of the shaft that has not yet had wood removed, needs to be down on the V groove so it turns concentrically and by turning the shaft like that you will see any high spots as they reach top dead centre. Perhaps turn the shaft, every now and then, without removing any shavings, just to see if any high spots need to be brought down. It seems as if starting with the shaft only part way along the groove might be better than starting with the shaft right along to the end stop. As you move further in towards the end, any unsupported length will become better supported.
    I have a shoulder plane that has a shape that lends itself to fitting side runners. Side runners could allow the plane body to run along the taper jig without being able to cut the jig as it works. I guess that is equivalent to your second wider jig for the plane to slide on. I like your idea better as it keeps the plane on line as it works, yes?

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    Hello Geoff. Thanks for the reply. I can see the merit of your idea. I will make a Vee block and a planing jig at the correct angle. I think I will have to take off a shaving and then advance the shaft to expose the next section until I get the full length taper. I don't know how I had the time to go to work before I retired!

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    Heehe, retirement...it just means you do more jobs rather than the one you were paid to do.

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    Hi Dennis,
    Just had another idea. In stead of planing on top of the V groove, how about turning the jig and the plane over onto their sides. A shooting board for planing end grain is arranged that way,yes? The plane will have a good edge to run along that has no cutter to disturb its travel. Also, what was the upper edge of the V groove will be run along by the part of the sole of the plane that has no blade protruding.( assuming it is a smoothing plane where the blade is not full width of the sole. So the plane travels in a straight line in both planes( horizontal and vertical) so no fear of the plane sliding off to one side compared to the V groove direction. Nor will the plane tip side to side as it runs on the round surface of the wooden shaft. I think that will give better control of the cutting, all round. heehee

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    Quote Originally Posted by geoffretired View Post
    Hi Dennis,
    Just had another idea. In stead of planing on top of the V groove, how about turning the jig and the plane over onto their sides. A shooting board for planing end grain is arranged that way,yes? The plane will have a good edge to run along that has no cutter to disturb its travel. Also, what was the upper edge of the V groove will be run along by the part of the sole of the plane that has no blade protruding.( assuming it is a smoothing plane where the blade is not full width of the sole. So the plane travels in a straight line in both planes( horizontal and vertical) so no fear of the plane sliding off to one side compared to the V groove direction. Nor will the plane tip side to side as it runs on the round surface of the wooden shaft. I think that will give better control of the cutting, all round. heehee
    Great minds think alike. I tried that yesterday Geoff using a low angle block plane. It does work but it is tedious, but then I suppose all 'manual' methods will be! For the few arrows I will be making it might not be worth the effort to design and make a more repeatable solution. I might have to return to the sandpaper channel method.

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    Hi, Yes indeed. I have been in similar situations many times. Do I improve X or carry on with the original? I spent ages trying to make a gadget to put headlight bulbs into my Audi, so I didn't need to remove the whole lamp unit first. I did get something that worked up to a point, but it wasn't a better solution. But sometimes, we need to start on the work in order to find out whether reality matches expectations or not.

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