Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 6 of 13

Thread: WOODEN ARROWS AND SPINE, THE EFFECTS OF CUTTING THE ARROW TO YOUR LENGTH

  1. #1
    In the Red duffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    London, United Kin
    Posts
    391
    Blog Entries
    1

    WOODEN ARROWS AND SPINE, THE EFFECTS OF CUTTING THE ARROW TO YOUR LENGTH

    Hi

    I make my own arrows but have no way of testing accurate spine, i buy arrow shafts from a shop that they write on the spine of the arrow, say 35-40 spine.

    the shafts are 32" in length, however i cut the shaft down to 28" does that effect the spine? does it change it? or just the weight is changed (i cut from one end only)

    by the time i put on my point and nock the total arrow measurement from tip of point to throat of nock is 29" long.

    so is my made up arrow still 35-40 spine, its only that bow manufacturers mention about using arrows so many spines over the bow weight and if im chopping the shaft down do i get different numbers at the end, ive always tended to go on total arrow weight at the end to make sure its safe for my bow.

    any help would be appreciated

  2. #2
    In the Red Si2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Baffins
    Posts
    310
    Static spine rating in lbs is measured across a 26" arrow length.
    A long arrow is rested on two points 26" apart. The bits that hang off the end don't really matter.

    So it doesn't affect the rating written on your arrow....

    BUT it does affect dynamic spine and that value is the resultant of a complex equation with several varaibles. These include static spine, arrow length, pile mass, arrow geometry (tapered, bobtailed) fletching size, fletching shape and arrow mass, to name a few.

    The static spine is a great way to group bare shafts - the rest needs plenty of experimentation, which is the fun bit..


    Si

  3. #3
    In the White
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Si2 View Post
    Static spine rating in lbs is measured across a 26" arrow length.
    A long arrow is rested on two points 26" apart. The bits that hang off the end don't really matter.

    So it doesn't affect the rating written on your arrow....

    BUT it does affect dynamic spine and that value is the resultant of a complex equation with several varaibles. These include static spine, arrow length, pile mass, arrow geometry (tapered, bobtailed) fletching size, fletching shape and arrow mass, to name a few.

    The static spine is a great way to group bare shafts - the rest needs plenty of experimentation, which is the fun bit..


    Si
    And if you do get a spine tester like I did. Check the things is calibrated!!! Oops!

    Has anyone ever tried bare shafting longbow arrows? I did try it the recurve way, but ended up having to just put a flag out as a reference point to aim at. I couldn't get my shafts anywhere close to the target, so just had to settle for them grouping where they were. Maybe this year I'll get around to trying to match shafts to bows, but with 4 different bows this could take me all year!

    It seems to me that as long as you manage to produce a set of arrows that groups (hopefully somewhere near the target!) then you are quite literally going in the right direction.

    The time and effort and pain involved in trying to get a close matched set that suits your bow and shooting style is enormous. I've only gone as far a weight matching so far. Some people seem to think that accurate spining is more important than weight matching.

    Personally I think that until you are shooting at a level where most of your arrows are hitting at 100 yards then any inconsistency in your shooting outweighs the arrow variation. However every little helps!

  4. #4
    In the White
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Abingdon, Oxfordsh
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Skippy View Post
    Personally I think that until you are shooting at a level where most of your arrows are hitting at 100 yards then any inconsistency in your shooting outweighs the arrow variation. However every little helps!

    I'd disagree slightly with this purely on the basis that if your arrows aren't matched then you will never know if you are being consistant in your stance/draw/anchor etc as it could just be the arrows flying differently to each other rather than a problem with your technique.

    But going to the original post I would reccomend Richard Head longbows, with their online store you can buy 5/16 Boyton pine shafts that are spine and weight matched, it costs a little more but I think it is worth it if you don't have time to get to a shop yourself, with their matching service they will match your specified spine weight by +/- 1lb, so if you ask for 43lb spines then you would probably get a mix of 42, 43 and 44ib weights, they also match the physical weight of the shafts to within 25 grains which isn't too bad.

    You also mentioned that the bow manufacturer said get spine weighted shafts over the bow weight, thats a new one to me so I don't really know, but as was previously mentioned the static spine won't change as so you do not cut your shafts to less than 26 inches.

    Hope thats some help!

  5. #5
    In the White
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Destroyer of stands View Post
    I'd disagree slightly with this purely on the basis that if your arrows aren't matched then you will never know if you are being consistant in your stance/draw/anchor etc as it could just be the arrows flying differently to each other rather than a problem with your technique.

    But going to the original post I would reccomend Richard Head longbows, with their online store you can buy 5/16 Boyton pine shafts that are spine and weight matched, it costs a little more but I think it is worth it if you don't have time to get to a shop yourself, with their matching service they will match your specified spine weight by +/- 1lb, so if you ask for 43lb spines then you would probably get a mix of 42, 43 and 44ib weights, they also match the physical weight of the shafts to within 25 grains which isn't too bad.

    You also mentioned that the bow manufacturer said get spine weighted shafts over the bow weight, thats a new one to me so I don't really know, but as was previously mentioned the static spine won't change as so you do not cut your shafts to less than 26 inches.

    Hope thats some help!
    I think that I might have been as clear as mud as per usual!

    All I meant was that the standard 5lb range of spine is probably okay for most people. Finding which 5lb range is sometimes more of a problem. My first set of decent arrows I made that shot consistently well was only matched to a 5lb range, but they were weight matched to within 10 grains. I think that this is especially important if you are having to go with light arrows to get a reasonable sight mark at longer distances.

    If you can get spine matched and/or weight matched arrows at a reasonable price and your are confident that the spine is definitely right for you then definitely get them.

    In my case it has taken a year of playing around to find out what weight arrows suit which bow. I haven't fully nailed down the drawweight/spine yet. It is one of those things where you see lots of different opinions on the shooting line. I've heard of ranges of +10lbs to -20 lbs drawweight depending on the archer. Personally I go for about 10 - 12 lbs under my actual drawweight. That's before you start to muck around with tapered, barrelled or footed shafts if you choose to go down that route.

  6. #6
    In the White
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Abingdon, Oxfordsh
    Posts
    19
    Ah, I see and yes, getting to that right weight bracket is the tricky part, once you've done that you're most of the way there. Its just a bone of contention for me that most online shops offer the 5lb weight brackets, but they also have their +/- 1lb leeway, so you could end up with a dozen shafts ranging from (assuming 40 - 45lb bracket) 39lbs to 46lbs. That to me isn't very good, which is why when I spotted the spine and weight matched option in Richard Head longbows I was very happy

    And it took me about a year to get the recipe for my arrows just right as well! And for me 12lbs less then my draw weight does lovely

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 23/64 100 spine wooden arrow shafts.
    By tinturkey in forum Traditional Bows (Archive)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-03-12, 06:47 PM
  2. Wooden arrows - lower spine than should be for an Xlbs bow?
    By Igor in forum Traditional Bows (Archive)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23-05-08, 07:31 AM
  3. Wooden arrow length
    By ChakaZulu in forum Traditional Bows (Archive)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 22-12-07, 11:07 PM
  4. Determining Spine of Wooden Arrows
    By Joester in forum Traditional Bows (Archive)
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 18-02-07, 02:36 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •