Another output from a bored archer

ArcheryFox

Active member
I love this!

I did something similar about 3 years ago with aluminium extrusion and black iron.
It was also a really good excuse to learn how to thread and tap - my string posts are mostly straight, honest...
One thing I did was to add a boat winch on to one end allowing me to tension the strings for a period of time to ease out creep and whilst serving to get a nice tight wrap.

One thing I didn't do was turn the posts since there wasn't a lathe available at the time.
This does cause some issues with the strings sliding and it would be nice to have slightly smaller diameter at the loops sometimes.
Your ones look great and really add a nice touch.

Like you say, far sturdier and far cheaper than the similar commercial versions.

I really enjoyed experimenting with different methods of serving - doing the end loops with one continuous piece, using different directions, different materials (Halo is great for the centre, but I found my bow much quieter with 3D on the end loops) etc.
The possibilities become endless! :D

 
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Mark2

Member
I have an old Sherwood jig, probably around 30 years old. Its made loads of strings but flexes if you put much tension on it. The channel and extrusion are ideal. I like the winch ArcheryFox. We use to lift a 1/2 tonne keel with the same one.

I agree, 3D on the loops is nice and soft.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
The main reason string jigs flex under tension is having the base 2"wide and 3/4" deep. Turn the base material so the "wide" is vertical.
It will want to fall over but a couple of cross pieces, that can fold out will solve that.
 

Mark2

Member
It's an aluminium 20mm x 20mm square U channel with another (the same) running in side it. It just flexes.
I might just take the plates with the pillars off and bolt them to some channel, as most of the work has already been done.
ig.png
 

4d4m

Active member
Tired of string jigs that flex under tension or cost an arm and leg, I thought I would make one. 2m channel, 40x5mm plate and 1m of 8mm dia stainless rod. Total £35.00 Result... best string jig I have ever owned :)
That’s excellent! I’m looking at making something myself. I was thinking of using scrap timber of which I’ve got a fair amount in the garage but hadn’t worked out how to make it infinitely adjustable, so the channel idea is looking good.

2 questions:
What are the parts that clamp on the inside of the channel made from? More of the 40x5mm plate?
Did you turn down the rod yourself on a lathe or get someone to do it for you?
That’s the part I can’t do. I can drill stuff and tap threads at a pinch.
 
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ArcheryFox

Active member
What are the parts that clamp on the inside of the channel made from? More of the 40x5mm plate?
Did you turn down the rod yourself on a lathe or get someone to do it for you?
Can't comment for the channel, but on the extrusion there are fixings like [this] that you can slot in to the channel with a thread that sticks out. This thread then goes through the post mounts and can be locked with a nut.

When I looked I couldn't find anywhere that you can order lathe work to be done easily (hence my unturned posts) but I would definitely recommend trying to get this done - I should really try and get this done at some point to improve my jig.

If trying to make from wood could you perhaps mill a slot in the centre of a plank that you then slot the adjustable head through, and then tighten it to the main beam at the desired location using a sash or G clamp?
 

ArcheryFox

Active member
I like the winch ArcheryFox. We use to lift a 1/2 tonne keel with the same one.
I agree, 3D on the loops is nice and soft.
Hah, perhaps overkill, but for functionality and price it was the best option I found.
It's great being able to do everything in one place and on one jig, and being able to have things under tension whilst serving is nice.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
If trying to make from wood could you perhaps mill a slot in the centre of a plank that you then slot the adjustable head through, and then tighten it to the main beam at the desired location using a sash or G clamp?
Sometimes, if you can't mill a slot, two long saw cuts from on end will work. Chisel out the thing strip that is between the saw cuts. Then glue in a piece near the end to fill part of the slot to. keep the base piece strong.
I use a wing nut on the cross piece to fix it in the required position.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
2 questions:
What are the parts that clamp on the inside of the channel made from? More of the 40x5mm plate?
Did you turn down the rod yourself on a lathe or get someone to do it for you?
That’s the part I can’t do. I can drill stuff and tap threads at a pinch.
Yes, there is a piece of the steel plate inside the channel and yes I turned the end down on a lathe.
 

Berny

Active member
It's an aluminium 20mm x 20mm square U channel with another (the same) running in side it. It just flexes.
I might just take the plates with the pillars off and bolt them to some channel, as most of the work has already been done.
View attachment 8179
I use one of these amongst others (I have an Arten one too, but the Sherwood is better), but I mount on a B&D Workmate with 2 quick release clamps at the connection points ...stops any flexing. I tend not to make continuous loop strings, but use the jig to do centre servings when
I don't have the actual bow.
_DSC0089 (Medium).JPG
 
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4d4m

Active member
Sometimes, if you can't mill a slot, two long saw cuts from on end will work. Chisel out the thing strip that is between the saw cuts. Then glue in a piece near the end to fill part of the slot to. keep the base piece strong.
I use a wing nut on the cross piece to fix it in the required position.
I can't mill or rout but I can drill and saw. I'd probably drill a hole of the right dia at either and (and if it was a long slot, one or more in between), and saw or chisel out the bit in the middle.

It this case though I was thinking of having a series of holes and pegs (or bolts) to do the large length adjustment, and a small length of slot to allow the finer adjustment. Or even a short length of threaded bar like from a sash cramp which would double as a tensioner.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi 4d4m. It sounds like the same idea as mine. At one end the cross piece swivels on the spot. There are holes it can be mounted to at different distances from the end.
The other end has the cross piece fitted into a slot. The slot is about the same length as the spaces between the holes.
Sawing between the holes to make a slot is good it the maker has the saw to do that.Sawing two sides of the slot from the end, is much easier to get right if the only saw is a normal cross cut or rip saw.
How much adjustment required is a matter for the maker too. Used to make recurve strings, for his//her own bow, won't require a huge range.
Making strings for other people may add to that, and compounds with cables ; more still.
My base is from a wooden sash cramp.
 

4d4m

Active member
Hi Geoff, pretty much, except I was going to do a cross piece at one end only. This means swapping the string round to serve the other end but that's ok. I'm not going to be making strings every day.

Yes I get your point about the saw. As of yesterday I have a jigsaw :) but if not I'd probably drill more holes and chisel out between them especially if the slot was running with the grain. Takes a few seconds to drill each hole so it can be more efficient than sawing especially if it's awkward to keep the cut straight.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I don't serve the ends with serving thread, just wrap the ends of the bow string round and make the loop with that. Four posts is not really necessary; and the cross pieces usually reduce the rigidity of the whole thing. Three posts will be more rigid than four.
 
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