Any ideas on shoes?

Ant1.K3s

New member
It's a matter that I haven't found too much info on. I was wearing regular trainers but then read Simon Needham's book and he mentions that shoes with proper cushioning might be ruining your balance. Since then I've been using all-stars and similar flat shoes indoors and walking boots outdoors but on the downside they're not the best for standing for hours at a competition.
So the question is does anyone have any other suggestions? I was thinking tennis shoes might be an alternative but haven't got to try any.
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
Smacks of overthink to me... if in doubt try barefoot. or just go for comfort.
It would need a very deep layer of very squidgy gel to "ruin your balance".
Become your own expert... invent your own test... here's one I just thought of.
Stand on one leg...
Shut your eyes...
Count to 5
Have you fallen over?
Personally I favour a 2" stiletto heel ;)
Del
PS. The test is harder than you'd think... try barefoot on a firm surface as a benchmark.
 


urbin

New member
I thought it was the flatness rather than the squidginess that was the key (having said that my very squidgy snowbooks are crap to shoot in). Flat is good because you can put the optimal amount of weight on the front half of your feet without unbalancing. Skate shoes and converse sneakers are both good, and for summer I bought a pair of zero-drop running shoes (they're the minimalist running shoes with a totally flat sole, and have the added benefit of being extremely light). Inside those I wear a pair of orthotics, because I'm getting over an achilles injury. The only problem is winter - can't stand gumboots, sometimes shoot in Hi-Tec walking shoes but that's only if the ground is wet.

I've also read one of the top coaches (possibily Ki Sik Lee?) recommend shotput shoes as they are so flat, but they also have hard soles and may not be very comfy to stand in all day.

I also looked into golf shoes as they too seem to be designed for "standing" and walking rather than running. After I started to pay a lot of attention to how I was standing, as I was training myself out of locking my knees, I really started to notice the balance of my feet and how much weight I was putting on each, and flat sneakers works for me.

Bare feet aren't allowed here at all.
 


Nightimer

New member
Were you comfortable wearing trainers?
If so then carry on wearing them.
He says"might" be ruining your balance,that implies that he doesn't know for sure.
Such "information" is not worth squat.
Get some good lightweight walking boots for wet conditions,some good quality trainers for other times.
I have some Gortex walking boots that I have worn for many Yorks,they breathe, are waterproof and reasonably light.
How many archery fields have you shot on that were totally flat?
Most have lumps and bumps and dips,so what good would flat soles be.
Indoors is something different,you might benefit from flat soles,to be honest I am yet to be convinced.
 


backinblack

New member
I've heard that shoes for weightlifting work well (presumably they have similar characteristics to the shot put shoes) being flat soled but with a slightly raised heel which pushes one's body weight towards the toes. Also, I think that they aren't cushioned. This has been discussed a few times on Archery Talk:

archery shoes

shooting shoes

Archery Shoes ...... orthotics and instability

You might have to work around the more flippant comments though.

Best,
Backinblack
 


Ant1.K3s

New member
Were you comfortable wearing trainers?
If so then carry on wearing them.
He says"might" be ruining your balance,that implies that he doesn't know for sure.
Such "information" is not worth squat.
Get some good lightweight walking boots for wet conditions,some good quality trainers for other times.
I have some Gortex walking boots that I have worn for many Yorks,they breathe, are waterproof and reasonably light.
How many archery fields have you shot on that were totally flat?
Most have lumps and bumps and dips,so what good would flat soles be.
Indoors is something different,you might benefit from flat soles,to be honest I am yet to be convinced.
I was comfortable with my trainers but changing to all-stars I saw an instant increase of my scores by over 20-30 points. Could be some kind of placebo effect but that's why I'm asking for other people's insight. As for outdoors at least in the UK there aren't many options. You have to go with Gortex walking boots or risk soaking wet feet.
 


KidCurry

Active member
I wonder if this subject is a first for this forum? Anyway, I used to wear my walking shoes all the time but noticed indoors that I had a tendency to roll back on my heels from time to time. Walking shoe soles tend to be quite curved at the heel and toe and even down the sides. Changed to a shoe with absolutely flat soles without too much padding and it make a big difference to my stability both indoors and out. The feet do ache a bit after a full 1440 though as I tend to stand all day.
 


Corax67

Active member
I've worn a few styles of shoe so far and found that flat deck shoes left me with leg & back ache after a only morning session.

Frequently shoot straight after work in high ankle Steel toecap & midsole work boots - super comfy

This weekend was shooting in full leather walking boots without any trouble or noticeable balance issues.

It could of course be that I am not a good a enough archer yet to actually notice the difference my footwear makes to my shooting :)



Karl
 


Zhoo Zhoo

Member
Interesting conversation! I've tried a few shoe styles out and I felt great with a small heel rather than completely flat because it put less strain on my lumbar spine. That might just be me though; I do have a more pronounced kyphosis and lordosis than most folk. However, I opt to wear flatter shoes most of the time because it's easier to walk and I did also wonder if it affects where I'm aiming as I gap shoot. So I try and be consistent!

Sue
 


Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
After a conversation in a Lilleshall training session and the coachs' suggestions, I've got some Adidas Adizero Shotput 2 shoes - but I haven't tried them out yet....
The point is, apparently, that like top-level rifle/pistol shooters (the standing-up variety), archers aspiring to elite level need the most stable possible platform. I.e. shoes with minimal wobble. Such special shoes have wide flat soles with very little give/foam. They're available as speciality rifle/pistol shows, or shot-put shoes, etc..
Do they make a different? I don't know personally. Maybe at elite level...
 


Last edited:
Adidas GSG9's V2
Comfortable from day 1.
I work 13 hour shifts in them.
Waterproof, breathable.
You can sprint in them or climb mountains.


- - - Updated - - -

Adidas GSG9's V2
Comfortable from day 1.
I work 13 hour shifts in them.
Waterproof, breathable.
You can sprint in them or climb mountains.
 


Attachments

Zhoo Zhoo

Member
These are what I went for with a view to being comfy and tough for yomping around on a field shoot (one fine day!)

- - - Updated - - -

These are what I went for with a view to being comfy and tough for yomping around on a field shoot (one fine day!)
 


Attachments

riccardo

New member
I'm not so expert and not so accurate in shooting to notice any significant difference on wearing different type of shoes. In any case I do not believe that Jake Kaminski (just to mention one) could also see differences in results while changing its pair of shoes. In his case, of course, because I'm sure that he is able to set perfectly his own body balance, disregarding whatever he wears on his feet.
 


Geophys

Member
I know that KSL recommends Adidas adiStar Shot Put Throwing Shoes. Personally I like my Merrel Moab GTX approach shoes, good foot support a firm sole and waterproof. My sport used to be target rifle shooting and we would have not even considered shooting standing in anything less that purpose made shooting boots such as those by Gehmann or Sauer, Google Target Shooting Boots. The difference these made over trainers and such was enormous, but we did have nice flat firing points.

Colin
 


Phil Sheffield

New member
I hear tell that in competition sandals are not permitted so I imagine bare feet are not either.

if I have had my bike boots on since early morning and the day is hot I assure you my boots and socks are coming off. Surely bare feet on grass is after all the way we were meant to be.
 


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