Barebow coaching

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Kerf

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I know we’ve sort of covered this before but I wanted to share a frustration with you all and garner opinions.
We’ve recently get three new barebow archers in the club, all newbies from a beginners course.
At first the coaches, who did a level one course, were trying to persuade them to go freestyle.
Now one of the coaches has decided, having “done some research” he’s now an “expert” in barebow despite never having shot his bow without all the freestyle gubbins.
He’s giving totally crap advice to the barebow newbies.
Now, I have not done a coaching course but was taught by experienced archers and a level 2 coach and have been shooting barebow for seven years. The newbies are asking me questions about kit and tuning, string and face walking etc but this “coach” keeps interrupting and filling their heads with BS.
What’s the best way forward?
All thoughts welcome.
 

LAC Mark

Active member
That's a hard one, you risk upsetting the coach if help these archers, and if you don't they may well end up totally confused and giving up.

Can you book a session with these archers (away from the coach) and see what their feelings are?
 

Kerf

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That's a hard one, you risk upsetting the coach if help these archers, and if you don't they may well end up totally confused and giving up.

Can you book a session with these archers (away from the coach) and see what their feelings are?
I’ve been able to answer their questions when the coach is not there and give advice. In fact I had a friendly (ish) chat with the coach about the quality of his advice and he acknowledged he was only repeating what he'd read and seen on YouTube. The problem with the newbies is that they are so new that you could tell them anything and they’d believe you. They haven’t yet got the experience to filter the good from the bad. I am keeping an eye on them nonetheless.
 

Mark2

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KidCurry leant me his book on barebow called "the art of string walking". It is a good reference work for barebow and although primarily field and 3d it is still a good reference for target.
 

Kerf

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KidCurry leant me his book on barebow called "the art of string walking". It is a good reference work for barebow and although primarily field and 3d it is still a good reference for target.
I am currently re-reading this book for the umpteenth time and get something new from it each time.
 

geoffretired

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I’ve been able to answer their questions when the coach is not there and give advice. In fact I had a friendly (ish) chat with the coach about the quality of his advice and he acknowledged he was only repeating what he'd read and seen on YouTube.
I would try to have some further chats with the coach. The first chat is the hardest as there is no way of knowing what the reaction will be.
If the coach admits already that he is struggling, there is a good chance you could get together and explore this together.... for the benefit of the beginners eventually. You and coach on the same page would be a brilliant success. That only happens after hard work.
 

beleg2

New member
Coaching is a matter of trust. If you're willing to help those new archers, you'd better slow down.
Try not to upset this coach, otherwise it may start to work against you. I deal with this and other problems from time to time.
If you give them little tips to get better, then naturally they will start asking you in no time.
"There's only something worse than ignorance, motivated ignorance" JMHO
 

Kerf

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Coaching is a matter of trust. If you're willing to help those new archers, you'd better slow down.
Try not to upset this coach, otherwise it may start to work against you. I deal with this and other problems from time to time.
If you give them little tips to get better, then naturally they will start asking you in no time.
"There's only something worse than ignorance, motivated ignorance" JMHO
Thank you. That’s excellent advice.
 

little-else

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At least the coach has the sense to understand that his experience is lacking.
This is a problem with how coaching courses are run and there will be variance from county to county but even with a level 2 qualification the coach wont have specialised in any particular bowstyle.
We have a recently qualifies coach at our club who has been avidly reading all of the other material he got on his coaching course and now thinks that specific rules that apply to ranking tournaments also apply at club shooting days as far as the duties of field captains etc and althought he realised his error after re-reading his notes it did cause confusion and delay on the first day he was charged with using his whistle when it hadnt been an issue with him up to that point
Coaching should be about that and if necessary devolved from all of the other stuff that gets lumbered with it such as administration and even most of the protection issues where thay arent applicable.
So where do you find a coach for a particular bowstyle? I shoot most things with mixed results and can offer advice on what works for me when someone is clearly struggling but that isnt really coaching or instruction but most other members in my club are in the same position and if you offer advice when the coaches are supposedly supervising people you run the risk of offering contrary advice and slowing down the shooting session which makes the others who have no interest in how new members are getting on start to harrump.
So, best way forward? get the novice to share a target with you and choose a time when their coach is busy so they get your attention. It will make their continued participation more likely as well as a friendly face can determine whether they keep at the sport or let it slide when that original enthusiasm has waned
 

geoffretired

Supporter
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So, best way forward? get the novice to share a target with you and choose a time when their coach is busy so they get your attention. It will make their continued participation more likely as well as a friendly face can determine whether they keep at the sport or let it slide when that original enthusiasm has waned.
I think that is a good idea. I also think it is a shame IF it has to be done like that.
This aspect of club life isn't new. BUT it is a barrier when it is left to continue unchecked.
It runs alongside committee members who have an " office for life". New blood is not encouraged and it is hard to stand up to be counted when the other candidate has had the job for 30years.
 

English Bowman

Well-known member
Would the coach be open to shooting bare bow with you for a session or two exchanging hints and tips?
He can learn what works and what doesn't, and if you listen to what he has to say you can separate the wheat from the chaff, and give him feedback on what works, and what doesn't and most importantly why.
As a coach I shoot all styles occasionally, and although I'd learnt a lot about compounds over the years a while back I had the opportunity to shoot compound with Tom Duncan, an excellent shot. Whilst in theory I had the qualification and I'm not sure he did (Not saying he doesn't I genuinely don't know he never said.) he taught me so much on shooting and therefore coaching compound in the half hour session I had that it was worth more than any coaching seminar I've ever been on.
 

Kerf

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Would the coach be open to shooting bare bow with you for a session or two exchanging hints and tips?
He can learn what works and what doesn't, and if you listen to what he has to say you can separate the wheat from the chaff, and give him feedback on what works, and what doesn't and most importantly why.
As a coach I shoot all styles occasionally, and although I'd learnt a lot about compounds over the years a while back I had the opportunity to shoot compound with Tom Duncan, an excellent shot. Whilst in theory I had the qualification and I'm not sure he did (Not saying he doesn't I genuinely don't know he never said.) he taught me so much on shooting and therefore coaching compound in the half hour session I had that it was worth more than any coaching seminar I've ever been on.
Thanks for the idea. I’m not sure he would be that open minded to be honest. He’s what the Victorians would have called a “mono-maniac” - he has very fixed ideas. However, I have lately managed some quality time with my BB colleague and progress has been made. He now politely listens to the Coach and then ignores his comments. It’s not an ideal solution by a long chalk but it’s a beginning. Thank you all for your advice.
 
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