Beiter Winder

dvd8n

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I've decided that I'm sick of the inconsistent tension from and impossibility of threading of my no-name generic serving tools and that I should put some of my birthday money into a decent one.

The consensus seems to be that the Beiter Winder is the one to get; however there are 3 models, standard, Profi (heavier) and Profi X-Heavy (heavier again), in increasing levels of price. I can't really find anything that articulates why heavier is actually better though.

Does anyone have any comments?
 

Rik

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I have a profi, which is okay for my use. I can put enough strain on it to break serving thread (knowledge from having been too heavy handed, once or twice). The standard one has plastic rollers, which I did not altogether trust, given that I like to pull hard on the serving when doing the knot.
The profi "heavy" one additionally has bigger nuts on it to add weight. I'm not altogether sure whether that makes a real difference...
 

ArcheryFox

Active member
I would certainly say you are right going with some version of the Beiter!
I have used the standard model for a long time to make perfectly good recurve strings with tight Halo serving (though admittedly I've never pulled it so tight the serving snapped 😬). Last time I researched this I believe the Beiter website recommends the standard for personal string building, and the profi models for high volume use (shops, coaches, and professional string builders). Supposedly the X-heavy gives a tighter serve due to 'centrifugal forces'......, but I find the standard one goes plenty tight enough for me.
So I'd say any would work for personal string building/re-serving and to go with what you feel you can trust most.
 
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dvd8n

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Thanks guys. I wasn't finding the seller's websites very informative at all. Merlin was particularly unhelpful with this gem:
  • Extremely fine adjustable friction and tension, thanks to the mounted puffs. (O-Ringe).
I mean, what???!!?
 

Stretch

Active member
I‘ve used them all. The heavier versions are a little better if you want really tight serving and have the coordination to spin the jig quickly.

The standard version is great too.

If you think you might “worry” about the plastic rollers on the standard go for the Profi (I upgraded mine but that probably costs more these days). For me the X-heavy version slows me down as the knobs stick out too far (titter titter). Depends on how much £6 means to you…

Stretch
 

albatross

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I had a similar problem to you. I put a 'Thackery Washer' (it's a double coil spring washer) under the tensioning nut it works fine for me.
 

Corax67

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I use the standard version and as I’m club equipment officer it gets a fair bit of use making strings and repairing old servings - had it for years and it’s not showing any signs of wear.

Top quality product that should give you years of service.
 

StevoNilo

Member
Standard one is perfectly fine. One of the plastic rollers can get scored after a while. Depends how much you use it and how much force you use to finish off ends. I tend to snip off enough and wrap the loose serving end around an allen key and pull it tight. Beiter, German of course do sell spare parts, including metal replacement rollers if the plastic ones are wearing out too much. It's a great winder. Well made, tension holds well. Worth the money.
 

Geophys2

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I have a Profi, I wanted the metal rollers and for the price difference over the number of years it'll be used it was an easy choice. I do however also have a Bearpaw serving tool, which is really nice. I make probably one or two strings a week and in fact I find myself using the Bearpaw for the majority of the time, I just seem to get on better with it.
 

dvd8n

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Thanks everyone, I've ordered a Profi; I decided that I'd like the robustness of the steel rollers but I couldn't see any real need for the extra weight of the heavy model.

Albatross, I decided against trying to put spring washers in one of my old ones as a major problem that I have is threading the things. I don't know why I have such trouble; my wife can do it in seconds. And it's not my eyes - I've tried to do it with a huge magnifying glass and all that gets me is a massive IMAX style view of the thread refusing to go though the hole.
 

albatross

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Thanks everyone, I've ordered a Profi; I decided that I'd like the robustness of the steel rollers but I couldn't see any real need for the extra weight of the heavy model.

Albatross, I decided against trying to put spring washers in one of my old ones as a major problem that I have is threading the things. I don't know why I have such trouble; my wife can do it in seconds. And it's not my eyes - I've tried to do it with a huge magnifying glass and all that gets me is a massive IMAX style view of the thread refusing to go though the hole.
The problem with ordinary spring washers is that the 'split' is the only side where pressure is applied (unless you tighten them down fully). The thackery washer being a double coil washer applies the pressure more uniformly around its circumference even before you tighten fully. That gives you more control over the pressure being applied.
 

wully

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Used my Beiter Winder for the first time today, first serving was a bit...well it was the first one. 2 nd one a lot better. I didn’t get the hang of spinning it ‘no hands’ though..
 
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