Bruise from full draw - why?

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

lureynol

New member
I shot for a few hours yesterday, and noticed some pain upon release where the bowstring met my body at full draw. Just checked today and I have a massive bruise. It's the first time I've had any pain there, but if this continues I may have to invest in a chest guard. The bruise and the pain I'm not too bothered by, but I have two questions stemming from it, one theoretical and one form-related:

1. Why is the pain (and presumably the bruise) created/generates upon release, when the bowstring should be moving away from the body at speed, not towards it?

2. (Obviously a true and reliable answer to this is impossible without personally observing my form, but...) What have I possibly just changed in my form to suddenly make the string bruise and hurt? I've been shooting for months and this has never been a problem, although I have noticed before that the string does contact my body at full draw (I'm overweight).

Many thanks!
 
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Bald Eagle

New member
You'll probably have to close your stance so that when you come to full draw the string makes contact with the side of your chest rather than across it! This will increase your draw length, marginally, too.
 

Vanya Goud

Member
Ironman
To get a bruise on your body suggests that the string is not just going forward and must have some sideways component of movement on release. Probably worth getting someone to look at your alignment as that is an unusual one.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Where abouts is the bruise?
From the point where the fingers relax, the string moves round the finger tips and towards the archer's chest, bowarm. It then moves away from the bow arm and again, back towards it nearer brace height close to the place where arrow and string separate.
Sometimes a change in shooting style, or posture causes tha string to strike the arm or somewhere. Turning the head further round and bringing the string further across the jaw towards the bow shoulder, can do the damage. Sometimes increasing draw length brings it on. Sometimes the archer's shoulder moves in towards the string path.
 

Archers Paradox

New member
I agree with what Geoff says, unless you are using a release aid then the initial movement of the string is towards the body around the finger tips. Only someone watching can really tell you exactly what is happening but are you plucking the string, exaggerating the movement into the chest?

Is the string on your finger tips or properly hooked in. The string should be at the first knuckle but someone facing you should be unable to see your finger nails. The back of your hand should be ralxed and straight and when you release the string it should be a case of the fingers relaxing to let the string pull through with them coming back to the original position once the string has passed. The hand movement should be back and close to the neck rather than from your face, down to the chest or waving behind your head.
 

compkiller

The American
American Shoot
I shot for a few hours yesterday, and noticed some pain upon release where the bowstring met my body at full draw. Just checked today and I have a massive bruise. It's the first time I've had any pain there, but if this continues I may have to invest in a chest guard. The bruise and the pain I'm not too bothered by, but I have two questions stemming from it, one theoretical and one form-related:

1. Why is the pain (and presumably the bruise) created/generates upon release, when the bowstring should be moving away from the body at speed, not towards it?

2. (Obviously a true and reliable answer to this is impossible without personally observing my form, but...) What have I possibly just changed in my form to suddenly make the string bruise and hurt? I've been shooting for months and this has never been a problem, although I have noticed before that the string does contact my body at full draw (I'm overweight).

Many thanks!

Is the bruise down the side of the moob ( yes I have them too)? If you are pulling the string into your body, you are creating a presure point which in itself could cause the sorness. Also when you release, it is not only the string that moves but the said area of body where it was pressing in that is then shot forward when the string goes. Try it with your hand. Pull across your chest then let go and see how it feels. A chest guard would keep everything in check and not let it all spring back as much.

As to cause. It could be that you have closed your stance, thereby pulling into the side of your chest instead of across it. Or you may have brought your anchor more to the front of your jaw instead of to the side, with the same effect.
 
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Rik

Supporter
Supporter
I've seen something like that with a, um, larger female.
She would bruise if she didn't wear the correct bra. The mechanism seemed to be that the string would form an indentation as she pulled in hard to her chest. In effect she was folding skin into the path of the string.
Two cures:
1. a good bra :)
2. Getting more in line.
The last one is counter-intuitive, but it works because you draw straight towards the body, closer to the armpit, rather than along the side.
 

mediumtab

Member
AIUK Saviour
If you continue with contact,the bruise will become a lump............
Invest in a good chestguard,alter your style to clear the chest - you might try moving your weight further onto the balls of your feet -keep a steady balance you can repeat,but clear the string from the chest,even if it means altering your reference point.
Get a club coach to look at your technique and adjust your style if you need to......
 

GoneBad

Member
I don't think Compkiller agrees with us Rik!!
I understand what Compkiller is saying. With a closed stance the string will be more inclined to scrape over the moob which will then pop back into position. When the string is released it will try to travel through the moob. With an open stance the string will move more directly away from the body and miss the moob.

Lureynol, your fine physique is obviously far better suited to compound. My string doesn't interfere with my moobs. High scores and all the cake you can eat :cake::yummy:
 

GoneBad

Member
Gone Bad, I think you have your open and closed stance in reverse order!
Open stance - toes of front foot in line with heel of rear foot, chest turned more towards target.
Square stance - both feet level, side of body towards target.
Closed stance - heel of front foot in line with toes of rear foot, chest turned away from target
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
Properly, open or closed is irrelevant. In both stances the upper body should end up in line - the difference is in the angle of the hips and the twist in between.
So the difference being talked about here is not really stance (unless people are advocating a completely broken line, bent at the shoulder!).
It's about whether the string is drawn along the front of the chest or into the side. Along the front is problematic for big people (of any gender) as to get the line closer, they end up pressing the string into the chest. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.
That's why I would suggest a more in line draw, closer to the bow arm bringing the string into the side of the pectoral, rather than the front. Probably still need a good chest guard, but it removes the major problems.
 

Little Miss Purple

The American
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
American Shoot
Short arms and big boobs = sore boob, regardless of stance.. Answer is chest guard!. I had this problem when I shot recurve.. My grouping was tighter without chest guard but the pain significant! I spent hours shooting with 2 very experienced archers watching my form to try to suss out the problem and find a solution (they assured me they weren't just watching my boobs! Lol). Sometimes we just have to work with the body shape we have. :beer:
 

lureynol

New member
Guys,

Thank you so much for the wave of responses! I think what confuses me the most is that I've been the same size (and yes compkiller, with moobs) since I started shooting five months ago, and this is the first time this has occurred. I'm going to get one of our coaches to look at my form tonight, but in the meantime, can those of you in the same position I am in recommend the best chest guard for bigger chaps? I've seen the ones a lot of the skinnier members of my club wear, and they're just not going to cut it.

And gonebad, while I thank you for the advice, I find myself wanting to have my cake, and shoot recurve too. :cheerful:
 

Phil Reay

New member
one thing to look for is pulling away from your face on release. i was hitting my arm a lot and couldn't understand it. someone stood behind me and watched. it wasn't a lot but it was happening. corrected that and hey presto, no more arm slap (thank you watcher, it was getting bloody painful)
 
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