clicker for beginner - yay or nay?

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
That's an interesting idea. Thinking about it, it might be easier to learn a clicker without a sight. No reason to get hung up on it, if you're not trying to stop and aim (usual error).
 


jonUK76

Member
I've been shooting about 7 months and am not using a clicker yet, for shooting. I don't think my coach wants me to use one yet. I do have a clicker though, and all I've been doing with it so far (as a self devised exercise) is practising drawing to my anchor point, holding for a few seconds and then pulling through the final few mm with back tension to release the clicker before resetting. Repeat 10-20 times.. My thinking is it might help with muscle memory of the shooting process without worrying about hitting a target.
 


Rik

Supporter
Supporter
In my experience: door, wall, wardrobe,tv :) ... and when you start using the clicker in ernest you WILL let go at some point :)
Bound to be something glass. . . picture frames are spectacular: I never knew you could powder glass like that. . .
 


ipob

New member
Don't start, there's already a hole in the garage side door from the kids 'play' bow that I may or may not have used. officer.

Feelings about the clicker are mixed. It gives a consistent point but I keep adjusting it as it's not quite 'right' - which is essentially what I was doing with my draw anyway. At least I've tried it and can see where it may help. My coach did some video analysis of my shooting from 3 different angles - the overhead one had technical probs, so just the 3. Been quite positive - I want to make sure I don't get any major issues early on. Not quite the 3 score and 10 but not getting any younger!
 


Rik

Supporter
Supporter
Don't start, there's already a hole in the garage side door from the kids 'play' bow that I may or may not have used. officer.

Feelings about the clicker are mixed. It gives a consistent point but I keep adjusting it as it's not quite 'right' - which is essentially what I was doing with my draw anyway. At least I've tried it and can see where it may help. My coach did some video analysis of my shooting from 3 different angles - the overhead one had technical probs, so just the 3. Been quite positive - I want to make sure I don't get any major issues early on. Not quite the 3 score and 10 but not getting any younger!
There's a problem there. . . If you're constantly moving it, then the likelihood is that the thing which is not right, is not the clicker :) it's a hard lesson, as when we start we keep changing things to get better. But you reach a point when you have to reduce the amount of change; strive to keep things the same. Consistency. From shot to shot. End to end. Week to week.
 


ipob

New member
Good point, I have only used it for a few ends just to satisfy my curiosity. I haven't even got my own log rod yet! but that's for a different bit of the forum.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I think the main thing about setting a clicker for the first time is to make sure it isn't too far forwards of the button. If it clicks before you get the string to your face it can make problems. Draw with confidence and set it so that it doesn't go off while you settle into your anchor points.
Then, I think it is a good idea to stand close to a boss and just draw to your anchor with confidence. Don't bother about how close you are to the clicker, just imagine it is another inch to go. Then draw some more and it will click. Once you have found it isn't going too early( before you get string to face and settled) then pull till it clicks.... and keep on pulling to prove that you can pull even further if you want to. You could call that "pulling to 1cm past the clicker."
So, as an exercise you are pulling to your anchor and settling ( not stopping) and pull through the clicker and keep going past it.You might imagine that you draw another 1cm after it clicks. It doesn't matter if the distance isn't 1 cm. It is more important to know that you can pull right past the clicker.
In real shooting you can imagine that you draw to anchor and settle on aim, and draw further and your fingers fall off the string before they reach that "! cm past the clicker. The fingers fall off the string as the clicker goes, and because you expect to pull another 1cm, you get a nice follow through.
It's like pulling Christmas crackers; you don't stop pulling if it hasn't snapped. You are still pulling harder when it snaps and the two parts fly apart just like a follow through.
 


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