Compound release aid rule change

KidCurry

Well-known member
I have often thought that drawing a compound with a release aid with your thumb/finger on the trigger is far more dangerous than a high draw. So much so that I have considered if it should be banned in the same way a high draw is banned. It would also prevent a lot of TP where archers release as soon as they get to, or even near, the gold.
 


bimble

Well-known member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
is it even possible to draw a compound with your finger/thumb on the trigger?? I've never seen anyone manage it. Almost all TP issues I've seen are people who shoot the arrow as soon as they touch the trigger.

And "high draw" as such isn't banned... only "dangerous" draws that look like they would exceed the safety range. If the over shoot was long enough you could draw as high as you wanted and it'd be acceptable.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
is it even possible to draw a compound with your finger/thumb on the trigger??
Yes, I did it for twenty years. It might be more accurate to say 'covering the trigger'. I see this all the time, although not so much these days but watched someone shoot like this this last indoors and miss fired. In the same way you don't see armed police walking around with their finger on the trigger of their rifle. Most missfires I have seen are people drawing up covering the trigger. I suppose you would have to classify hinges with a similar rule. But then I've seen more blood from hinge use than triggers :)

And "high draw" as such isn't banned... only "dangerous" draws that look like they would exceed the safety range.
Which is the case for nearly every shoot I go to. If judge says I can't do it I consider that banned.
 


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bimble

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Which is the case for nearly every shoot I go to. If judge says I can't do it I consider that banned.
But it's not covered as "high" because you can have dangerous draws to the side as well. Hence the rules state "an archer shall not use any technique which, in the opinion of the judges, could, if accidentally loosed, allow the arrow to fly beyond a safety zone or safety arrangement." It's reliant on the safety zone.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I would ban high draw.... The one where the arrow is pointing clearly above horizontal for almost the entire draw. I see international level archers doing it that way.
I would ban fingers/thumbs on triggers during the draw too. I added a cover for my thumb trigger. The cover was a resting place for the thumb during the draw. After that I could move to the trigger, but not accidentally.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
If drawing 'dangerously' is banned by judges I wonder if drawing while covering the trigger is also dangerous? Funny the things you go to bed thinking about. It would cause issues as some releases now have safety levers, and hinges and back tensions have pegs. But if drawing at a safe angle of elevation perhaps the only person in danger of a false release is the archer themselves. Indoors may be different.
I remember when the hinge first came out. I thought then you would have to be crazy to shoot one. I think it has probably injured more archers than any other type but I shot one and only bled a couple of times and managed to avoid the dentist. I guess the lack of archery accidents in general means AGB have things about right.
 


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geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
The hinge is unique. It is the most frightening release while being the sweetest to use once you get past the anchor. I bought one recently with a safety. It should be the best of both worlds as it removes the danger. The problem is, operating the safety requires me to move my thumb and it ends up pressing into my neck and becomes a real distraction.The best thing for me is that the trigger requires no extra pressure... It is all about movement.The way the d lol is set free is so smooth.
 


Kernowlad

Active member
Whereas I had a complete disaster of a time with a hinge then thumb trigger. Basically set off a series of issues I’ve only just managed to (just about) sort.

I think policing such a trigger rule would be very difficult; I keep well away from it from lifelong experience with guns.

High draws often seem to happen when draw weight is too high. Double danger.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I think the high draw is likely to be more dangerous as it puts the arrow at a dangerous angle every time. With a level arrow, even a misfire will land short rather than out of the field
 


bimble

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Fonz Awardee
Ironman
I would ban high draw.... The one where the arrow is pointing clearly above horizontal for almost the entire draw. I see international level archers doing it that way.
Considering to hit almost any target an arrow HAS TO BE pointing above horizontal*, this is why the rule is worded the way it is...

* - in theory, even with a compound, you could stand halfway between an archer and a 70m target and the arrow would clear above your head by feet, with a recurve, several feet...
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Bimble I can see the problem, thanks for pointing that out.
If the archers are watched shooting, it should be possible to compare the aim elevation with draw elevation. Any that seem to be clearly different, could have attention drawn to them.
 


jerryRTD

Well-known member
Hi Bimble I can see the problem, thanks for pointing that out.
If the archers are watched shooting, it should be possible to compare the aim elevation with draw elevation. Any that seem to be clearly different, could have attention drawn to them.
You can say 'clearly different' but you would need a couple of pictures prove the point. No I think we are better off as we are arrow out side the overshoot.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I disagree, watch any archer and if the sight has to drop by something obvious, to reach their aim posture, then the draw was higher than necessary.
 


English Bowman

Well-known member
AGB field archery rules say that the arrow should be pointed at the target throughout the draw. (Although judges turn a blind eye to draws where the arrow is aimed low) I think that this should apply to target too. Fairly simple to check just by watching the draw, we have implemented it in our target club.
 


jerryRTD

Well-known member
AGB field archery rules say that the arrow should be pointed at the target throughout the draw. (Although judges turn a blind eye to draws where the arrow is aimed low) I think that this should apply to target too. Fairly simple to check just by watching the draw, we have implemented it in our target club.
As has been pointed out already that does not work at long ranges because of the elevation needed to hit the target.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
If the archer cannot see the gold because of his/her bow hand, how can he/she aim at the target?
If the target is visible because the hand is below the gold, then the bow arm will appear to an observer as being on the boss at the very least.
I think "aiming at the target" through the draw may be more usable than pointing the arrow at it.
 


English Bowman

Well-known member
As has been pointed out already that does not work at long ranges because of the elevation needed to hit the target.
It could work for target, if the arrow goes above the angle needed to hit the target it's not pointed at it. The rule isn't intended to be interpreted as a horizontal line, but as the angle needed to make the shot, this transfers easily to long range target, or even clout, where they just ban the high shooting arc.
 


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