Compound release aid rule change

LAC Mark

Member
How do you stay 'sighted' when you do not have a sight???????????
Easy, just because we don't have a sight bolted to the bow doesn't mean we don't sight the bow.
However, longbows at short distance could be a problem, were would the arrow go if loosed while pointing at a 20 yard target, way, way over the top.
Umm, there may well be some merit in the current wording.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
Although the original post was about covering the trigger when drawing not what constitutes a dangerously high draw, which are not the same thing, I suspect the wording will stay as it is. For Longbow, Barebow and Recurve the wording, and judgement calls are probably okay. It was compound that I originally posted for and as my calculations show you are taking about a judgement call for the difference between 5⁰ and 6⁰ elevation (148m and 177m cast) from a 300fps bow. There is no way a judge is going to call this. Especially when the required release angle is already 3.5⁰. I see no reason why the rules for target archery should not state when using a release aid 'all compounds to be drawn with the release hand and bow hand in the horizontal position and the bow not tilted in an upward direction prior to aiming'. Many compound archers already do this.
 


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bimble

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Horizontal is something most of us can judge quite well. Well enough to spot a draw that is clearly above that.
From the side... I bet from the archer's perspective it's a lot trickier (move one hand slightly faster then the other, "Wait, that's illegal now!!"). And are we now talking about hands being horizontal, or the arrow...?? Because you can have one or the other with a compound, but not both.
 


bimble

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wouldn't cover field archery though... on downhill shots even horizontal would be dangerously over-the-top...
 


bimble

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and yet the rule that's being questioned is in Part 1, Bow Safety of the rule book so covers ALL types of archery, because, for some reason, not shooting outside the safety area covers all types of archery. If you want to replace the rule for a target only rule, that means you also have to write in rules that covers field, clout, flight, crossbows, traditional longbow, indoors, and the "other forms of archery" that compromises section 10.
 


KidCurry

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and yet the rule that's being questioned is in Part 1, Bow Safety of the rule book so covers ALL types of archery, because, for some reason, not shooting outside the safety area covers all types of archery.
Sure... I'm not sure inconvenience is a good reason not to rewrite safety rules, although it happens :) One rule for all is always a compromise.
 


bimble

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and which of the suggestions so far offer better than the current one saying that an archer shouldn't have a technique that "could, if accidentally loosed, allow the arrow to fly beyond a safety zone or safety arrangements"?? Which for starters recognises that different venues might have different requirements for the same type of event...
 


geoffretired

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Bimble, I think that rule does cover all types of archery. It actually states the overriding reason for having the rule.
Perhaps the issue isn't the rule, so much as the way some judges allow a draw technique that clearly does not keep to that rule.
There is also the matter of archers breaking the rule, who should know better.
 


Corax67

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I was taught to draw compound with my thumb under the trigger (Carter Chocolate Addiction) and to not place my thumb on the trigger until I was ‘sight on’ to the target. I find it a very comfortable way to draw and it seemed the obvious and safe way to do it.

Used a hinge release a couple of times - not for me.

Curtailing any form of high draw is surely to be commended and strictly enforced no matter what the bowstyle (in target) for the safety of everyone - we strictly police it at club for certain.




Karl
 


KidCurry

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and which of the suggestions so far offer better than the current one saying that an archer shouldn't have a technique that "could, if accidentally loosed, allow the arrow to fly beyond a safety zone or safety arrangements"??
The current rule is fine if it can be judged. But for compounds I'm saying it can't. For other styles there is more margin.
Which for starters recognises that different venues might have different requirements for the same type of event...
I'm not sure what you mean...shorter than 150yds? If you mean longer overshoots, keeping hands horizontal will work for all overshoots. The judge doesn't have to guess what angle is safe for each compound and each peak weight for each venue. As with the 2015 Wroclaw example, people badly underestimate compound range. In the same way 70mph is the maximum speed on any UK road. There are roads where conditions would permit faster speeds but if police had to make judgement calls for each speed limit the system would be unenforceable.
 


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jerryRTD

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Easy, just because we don't have a sight bolted to the bow doesn't mean we don't sight the bow.
However, longbows at short distance could be a problem, were would the arrow go if loosed while pointing at a 20 yard target, way, way over the top.
Umm, there may well be some merit in the current wording.
you can draw a bead or you can take aim but you need a sight to sight a bow.
 


bimble

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The current rule is fine if it can be judged. But for compounds I'm saying it can't. For other styles there is more margin.
I'm not sure what you mean...shorter than 150yds?
150yds is a MINIMUM overshoot required (and that's assuming a flat ground, things like bunds can shorten that)... you can have more, which in turn changes what would be required to send an arrow out of the safety zone.
 


English Bowman

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you can draw a bead or you can take aim but you need a sight to sight a bow.
I beg to differ, I sight using the point of the arrow aiming off in order to hit the target. I also know some barebow archers that string-walk to use the point of the arrow to sight on the target. Some of them could beat many recurve archers who use a sight.
 


jerryRTD

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You are welcome to your opinion but I will go with basic English if you are going to 'sight' you have to use a sight other wise you are aiming refre to rule 204 a (I) which clearly states the exclusions that may be used as an 'aiming point' not sighting the bow
 


geoffretired

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I think that what is used as an aiming device is a red herring here. The issue is, will the arrow overshoot the safety zone?
The position of the hands( and the elevation of the arrow) are the most easily seen parts of the likely cause if there is a danger over an overshoot
 


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