Easton ACC ACG & Carbon Ones - Discontinued

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Whitehart

Well-known member
For 2021 these popular shafts in the UK ACC, ACG & Carbon Ones are discontinued.

The implications for many target clubs and club archers if we ever get back to shooting will be interesting.

Carbon Ones will be replaced with the Avance.
 

bimble

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yeah... when they pointed out that the ACC was as much work as an entire arrow manufacturer with so many sizes and components... it's not that surprising if you're planning on streamlining your product line that might be a shaft to go.

The ACG is annoying as I had been planning on getting a set for Christmas for the recurve... still might, though probably not till later in the new year now.
 

dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
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When it was explained in the podcast it made perfect sense from Easton's point of view. It's hard lines for the users though.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
It's discussed in this podcast if you're interested:
Easton Target Archery Podcast SPECIAL 2021 New Product Episode
So 'Pro Comp' is the 'modern day' ACC. I'm not sure many improving archers who want to upgrade from their £50 set of allys will want to fork out £240 for a set of arrows only available in 1 doz sets.
I don't keep up to speed with other manufactures. Is there an alternative a/c shaft at about the £11 price point?
 

Whitehart

Well-known member
So 'Pro Comp' is the 'modern day' ACC. I'm not sure many improving archers who want to upgrade from their £50 set of allys will want to fork out £240 for a set of arrows only available in 1 doz sets.
I don't keep up to speed with other manufactures. Is there an alternative a/c shaft at about the £11 price point?
No, Cartel Triples are close to Pro Comp money, but possibly... although before this announcement it was 12 months away, maybe the R&D will be speeded up now.

There seem to be good stocks for now and given we are either not able to shoot or shooting indoors demand is low at the moment and sales last year were slow for obvious reasons.
 

Geophys2

Member
The problem also is that Pro-Comp only go down to 570 spine, and are really designed for Compound use as described by Easton. Where is the average lowish poundage club archer going to go now for his first upgrade from aluminium, ours almost always ended up with one of the ACC 3-04 arrows in the 680-830 range of spine. Every target club I've belonged to has had a shared ground and a no-carbon rule so where do they go next. As KidCurry asks, is there another manufacturer a/c alternative?

Easton seem not to be interested in recurve archers except at the top end with the X-10 (watch ACE disappear next), which is of course mainly a marketing policy to keep the name up front. Their main market of course is the USA compound archer, who the pro-comp is aimed at.

I'd be more convinced of their argument regarding having to manufacture so many variations of the ACC, if they didn't make 8 variations of the FMJ hunting arrow.
 

Whitehart

Well-known member
I think the issue for Easton is that the ACC market is mainly the UK because of target shooting fields and restrictions on all carbon shafts. Last year they would have seen demand drop off a cliff. The rest of the world are quite happy with all carbon shafts, 100's of variable quality and price are being produced in china and Easton maybe losing out on this market. I also wonder if all carbon shafts from Fivics and Skylon are hitting x10 sales perhaps not at the top level but lower down the ranks.

Geophys2 the Pro Comp will now be available in more sizes to cater for recurve archers.
 

Geophys2

Member
Yes it does look like Cartel triples at about £14 per shaft are the only alternative now. I suspect that most people that are looking for ACCs will be able to find them for a while longer yet.
 

bimble

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The problem also is that Pro-Comp only go down to 570 spine, and are really designed for Compound use as described by Easton.
They've increase the spine range of the Pro Comp and it's now available in spines from 250 to 1150

I'd be more convinced of their argument regarding having to manufacture so many variations of the ACC, if they didn't make 8 variations of the FMJ hunting arrow.
The hunting market is seriously (and I mean considerably) larger than the target market. The NFAA did a report on archery in the US and some states had +1,000,000 bowhunters in them. You look at some of the big compound bow manufacturers such as Hoyt, Mathews, Prime... they list more hunting bows than target bows because that is where the majority of the archery market is.
 

Geophys2

Member
The hunting market is seriously (and I mean considerably) larger than the target market. The NFAA did a report on archery in the US and some states had +1,000,000 bowhunters in them. You look at some of the big compound bow manufacturers such as Hoyt, Mathews, Prime... they list more hunting bows than target bows because that is where the majority of the archery market is.
Oh I know, when I worked in the USA I shot as a member of a couple of clubs, out of more than a hundred archers I was one of very few pure target shooters and in fact the only one shooting an Oly recurve. The vast majority only shot target and 3D as practice for hunting. They couldn't understand the concept that bow hunting was illegal in the UK.

I'm not blaming Easton, if I were in their shoes, particularly in the current economic climate I would be retrenching back to my core market too. I'm sure ACE can't be a profitable line either.
 

Rabid Hamster

Well-known member
Ironman
the cartel triple is decent shaft but the loss of the ACG (aka navigator) is a sad loss. it was a well priced and performing arrow that I recommended to a lot of noobs making the move to dedicated archer.
 

Thorvald

Active member
Yeah too bad. ACC is actually a very nice arrow shaft, perhaps one of the best A/C shafts at an ok price. I still have some from my early years of archery. I think I shot with them (target) for minimum a decade and they are now maybe around 30 years old, but as good as new (if not I had cut them maybe a tad too short, to fit my compound or leverbow). ;)
 

iandall

New member
So 'Pro Comp' is the 'modern day' ACC. I'm not sure many improving archers who want to upgrade from their £50 set of allys will want to fork out £240 for a set of arrows only available in 1 doz sets.
I don't keep up to speed with other manufactures. Is there an alternative a/c shaft at about the £11 price point?
It looks more like the procomp is the modern day ACG. Same diameter, same spine, slightly reduced straightness tolerance.
 
They've increase the spine range of the Pro Comp and it's now available in spines from 250 to 1150



The hunting market is seriously (and I mean considerably) larger than the target market. The NFAA did a report on archery in the US and some states had +1,000,000 bowhunters in them. You look at some of the big compound bow manufacturers such as Hoyt, Mathews, Prime... they list more hunting bows than target bows because that is where the majority of the archery market is.
This is an old "belief" unsupported by much of anything. Early estimates counted each hunting license sold as a hunter, which is clearly an overestimate. The ATA has done extensive, nationwide surveys in the recent past that show that the numbers of target archers is larger than the number of bowhunters (many do both, so count them as each). I argue that target archers spend more on archery equipment than bowhunters do. (Think about the kinds of release aids used, sight scopes, even arrows.) Hunters spend a great deal of money on clothing, camping gear, ancillaries (deer stands, etc.), hunting tags, travel, etc. but on strictly archery gear, not as much as target archers do. There are more retailers set up to serve "outdoorsmen" but they don't sell much archery gear either.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
Like Geophys2 I worked in the USA, in the nineties. I remember going into archery shops hoping to stock up on archery equipment. If I was hunting I could have a plane load of cheap stuff. As a target archer I always left empty handed. I don't recall buying a single archery related item. Loads of Levi 501s at JC Penny for less than $20 though, mostly made in Mexico or Scotland :)
 
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