Easton ACC ACG & Carbon Ones - Discontinued

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Whitehart

Well-known member
I read a while ago that games consoles were killing all forms of hunting in the US which saw a 25% decrease in numbers of archers in 2018. Hunting was normally handed down from father the son. Then kids stopped going because they were playing console games and not interested in hunting and now they have grown up they are not able to pass this on to a new generation.

Great for the Bears :)
 

8ballali

Member
They'll just have to change to aluminium arrows.
I went to carbon arrows, and shoot at ranges. In outdoor competitions, I'll just enter record status competitions, so i can shoot my carbons whether they allow them at their venue or not.
 

Whitehart

Well-known member
They'll just have to change to aluminium arrows.
I went to carbon arrows, and shoot at ranges. In outdoor competitions, I'll just enter record status competitions, so i can shoot my carbons whether they allow them at their venue or not.
WRS not UKRS I guess, as organisers can still ban them at UKRS events as these are regulated locally.

The way things are going I don't think this will be an issue for the next 12 Months and by then there will be an alternative.
 

8ballali

Member
WRS not UKRS I guess, as organisers can still ban them at UKRS events as these are regulated locally.

The way things are going I don't think this will be an issue for the next 12 Months and by then there will be an alternative.
Thanks. I didn't know they could still refuse at UKRS competitions.
I better make sure I ask before entering then.
 

bimble

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WRS not UKRS I guess, as organisers can still ban them at UKRS events as these are regulated locally.
I though any sort of record status meant that that all carbon shafts couldn't be banned as they are legal equipment, even if you're only using the rules in the Green Book (UKRS) instead of the WA rule book (WRS). Unlike non-record status shoots where you are shooting under local regulations so the TO can pick & chose what rules they wish to apply.
 

LAC Mark

Active member
I though any sort of record status meant that that all carbon shafts couldn't be banned as they are legal equipment, even if you're only using the rules in the Green Book (UKRS) instead of the WA rule book (WRS). Unlike non-record status shoots where you are shooting under local regulations so the TO can pick & chose what rules they wish to apply.
At our clubs UKRS shoot carbon's are aloud, but not at normal club shoots.
 

Whitehart

Well-known member
I though any sort of record status meant that that all carbon shafts couldn't be banned as they are legal equipment, even if you're only using the rules in the Green Book (UKRS) instead of the WA rule book (WRS). Unlike non-record status shoots where you are shooting under local regulations so the TO can pick & chose what rules they wish to apply.
Clubs are regulated by AGB for UKRS WA are not involved and allow clubs to ban all carbon arrows if they choose to, it all goes back to when AGB thought they had a bylaw that allowed them to ban all carbon arrows at WRS events, which it did not.
 

bimble

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Clubs are regulated by AGB for UKRS WA are not involved and allow clubs to ban all carbon arrows if they choose to, it all goes back to when AGB thought they had a bylaw that allowed them to ban all carbon arrows at WRS events, which it did not.
Yeah, but I thought they only let them ban them for club shoots or non-record status shoots. Whereas UKRS level shoots have to follow the rules laid down in the Green Book and they say things like:

202. Recurve: The Recurve Bow is as described in WA Constitution and Rules, Book 3, Article 11.1. The Current version of the WA Rule is copied in Appendix F of this rule book.
Suggesting that the WA description of acceptable equipment counts, which includes arrows with an all-carbon shaft
 

Rabid Hamster

Well-known member
Ironman
after having spent hours looking for a badly shot all carbon arrow at one competition ... I'd have been quite happy if the things were banned under the geneva convention for cruelty to field parties! the metal detector was useless and we had to grid up the grass then use blunt hooks physically dragged through the grass/top inch of soil. we were into the second day of searching before discovery.
 

Whitehart

Well-known member
Yeah, but I thought they only let them ban them for club shoots or non-record status shoots. Whereas UKRS level shoots have to follow the rules laid down in the Green Book and they say things like:



Suggesting that the WA description of acceptable equipment counts, which includes arrows with an all-carbon shaft
In the past (I have not looked into this for a couple of years but don't believe it has changed)AGB then felt because of the unique situation that clubs find themselves in the UK it is acceptable to ban all carbon arrows but still recognise UKRS. I am sure if you protested the club in question would either let you shoot or cancel the shoot and that is the worry for AGB - I know clubs that are paranoid of losing their grounds for fear of a lost all carbon arrow that still put on great tournaments.

There are examples of archers missing at a tournament not declaring it and shooting another arrow. One extreme example 6 arrows were found on the field a week later had it been the school that would have been it for the club. Not hard to work out who it was initials on the arrow and narrowed down to 1 target no misses recorded and they walked away with a medal...
 

LAC Mark

Active member
In the past (I have not looked into this for a couple of years but don't believe it has changed)AGB then felt because of the unique situation that clubs find themselves in the UK it is acceptable to ban all carbon arrows but still recognise UKRS. I am sure if you protested the club in question would either let you shoot or cancel the shoot and that is the worry for AGB - I know clubs that are paranoid of losing their grounds for fear of a lost all carbon arrow that still put on great tournaments.

There are examples of archers missing at a tournament not declaring it and shooting another arrow. One extreme example 6 arrows were found on the field a week later had it been the school that would have been it for the club. Not hard to work out who it was initials on the arrow and narrowed down to 1 target no misses recorded and they walked away with a medal...
I do hope they were stripped of the meddle and banned from future events.
 

Rabid Hamster

Well-known member
Ironman
we had one archer who was notorious for missing, not finding the miss and saying nothing. how do we know? we had a bad miss one club night so it was an all hands on deck search over a wide area which threw up THREE of his arrows none of which were reported as missing. we also believe it was him who shot through the indoor curtain and the high up glass 'wall' beyond but said not a thing (the glass was small blocks so it held its integrity with a neat hole in the middle)
 

dropbear

Member
For 2021 these popular shafts in the UK ACC, ACG & Carbon Ones are discontinued.

The implications for many target clubs and club archers if we ever get back to shooting will be interesting.

Carbon Ones will be replaced with the Avance.
Not the ACC 😱 when I began shooting a compound in 2009 I bought a second hand set of ACC's and shoot them steadily up until late last year. Such a great sturdy arrow. Just before covid came along I bought another set of them. Looking forward to getting back out on the range now covid restrictions have been eased.
 

little-else

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after having spent hours looking for a badly shot all carbon arrow at one competition ... I'd have been quite happy if the things were banned under the geneva convention for cruelty to field parties! the metal detector was useless and we had to grid up the grass then use blunt hooks physically dragged through the grass/top inch of soil. we were into the second day of searching before discovery.
No worse than looking for wooden arrows from stick shooters. I agree that if you dont find them the problems multiply but you can get a slight signal on carbons with a metal detector if you turn the discrimination off and set the sensitivity to a point where you start to get interference. What is a bigger problem is people's inability to call their shots. Most misses should be limited to a small search area because you know you have pushed it over to the low left say but some people dont seem to have an idea where their arrows go even whne they hit the target so asking about their misses is a waste of breath.
No one mentions fibreglass.
 

Rabid Hamster

Well-known member
Ironman
No worse than looking for wooden arrows from stick shooters. I agree that if you dont find them the problems multiply but you can get a slight signal on carbons with a metal detector if you turn the discrimination off and set the sensitivity to a point where you start to get interference. What is a bigger problem is people's inability to call their shots. Most misses should be limited to a small search area because you know you have pushed it over to the low left say but some people dont seem to have an idea where their arrows go even whne they hit the target so asking about their misses is a waste of breath.
No one mentions fibreglass.
nope ... cant agree. woodies just dont have the power to really get themselves into the roots of the grass and out of sight except at close range (unless we are talking jungle) . they are slower, thicker, with a higher parabola in flight that carbons and they generate a lot more friction as they hit the ground. Result theres almost always something showing above the grass. If there isnt, its pretty likely it was at close range. Close range misses are easy to find.
its also easier to track a woodie in flight, rather an an invisible in flight carbon. close in will limit the search area unless the archer is an idiot, shortsighted or simply negligent ...... for 2 of those they can go look for their own arrows. Also woodie points are bigger for the same grain weight meaning the metal detectors stand a better chance of picking the point up. Have no issues looking for woodies ..... cant remember ever taking more that 5 - 10 minutes tops to find a woodie even short handed outside a field course. all carbons I'd flat out ban.

no-one mentions fibreglass for good reason! we skipped all ours years ago. ;)
 

dvd8n

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As someone who has spent ages looking for fragments of a wooden arrow I'd disagree. I well remember laying out the remnants of a woodie to try and identify the missing fragments.

"As far as we can tell we're still looking for two bits - a 5" bit with really sharp ends and a 3" bit with a nock on." etc etc

We have always found all the bits as far as we could tell but it could take a long time.

I could easily make a case for banning woodies on shared fields just as easily as carbons. But I'm not going to. I'm not looking to make anyone's life worse. But - if you shoot an arrow on a shared field you need to be prepared to find it.
 

Rabid Hamster

Well-known member
Ironman
"As far as we can tell we're still looking for two bits - a 5" bit with really sharp ends and a 3" bit with a nock on." etc etc
bits o wid lyin on that green grun ........... no a problem. Intact carbon spike buried in a playing field ..... PROBLEM! recently found on the field before we were evicted ... numerous tent pegs from Duke of Ed campers, part of the sit on lawnmower, 1 horn from a roe deer (I still have it), a dead seagull and half a dozen golf balls. :LOL:

thinking hard ... only time I ever had issue with a woodie was mibi 8 years ago where one of mine hit something metal (cant remember what it hit) and the arrow exploded. found all the wood but the modbod pile was missing. found it a couple of weeks later next to the long jump pit at our 70m mark. my target was at 50m. STILL preferable to all carbon! 😂
 
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