Filling in score cards

andyste1

New member
Beginner's silly question(s) time.

I need to get my handicap sorted so I'm going to have a go at scoring myself for the first time this weekend (I don't have a score book yet, so for now I'm going to print some score sheets from the internet). It seems that each row on a typical score card has space for recording two ends - half a dozen arrows each. Is there a reason for recording scores and running totals two ends at a time, other than to save space on the page? It would seem more logical to score each end on a separate row!

How do I record scores for 3-arrow ends - would I still record two ends per row, but enter arrow scores into the first 3 boxes and leave the remaining 3 blank? Then total up each row in the usual way?

And what happens when scoring a large round, e.g. a FITA 18 with 20 ends? I'm assuming score cards have enough room (they generally seem to have at least 10 rows of 2 ends each)! I've noticed some score cards have a "totals" row after every 4 or 5 normal rows. Is there any requirement to fill these in or just fill in the grand totals at the end of the round?
 


Tuck

New member
The reason for linear scoring is twofold, a good way of checking totals as you go, and a score for each dozen, which is a good measure of how you are doing.
The breaks after every 3 doz or 6/4/2 doz matches outdoor round distance changes. A universal score pad may well have 6/4/3/3 dozens to cope with all combinations of Metric and Imperial rounds.
Outdoors it is required to do each distance separately as there are records for distance scores as well as complete rounds.
Scoring should be done rigorously in practice so that when you go to a club or open tournament you will know what to do.
Beginner's silly question(s) time.

I need to get my handicap sorted so I'm going to have a go at scoring myself for the first time this weekend (I don't have a score book yet, so for now I'm going to print some score sheets from the internet). It seems that each row on a typical score card has space for recording two ends - half a dozen arrows each. Is there a reason for recording scores and running totals two ends at a time, other than to save space on the page? It would seem more logical to score each end on a separate row!

How do I record scores for 3-arrow ends - would I still record two ends per row, but enter arrow scores into the first 3 boxes and leave the remaining 3 blank? Then total up each row in the usual way?

And what happens when scoring a large round, e.g. a FITA 18 with 20 ends? I'm assuming score cards have enough room (they generally seem to have at least 10 rows of 2 ends each)! I've noticed some score cards have a "totals" row after every 4 or 5 normal rows. Is there any requirement to fill these in or just fill in the grand totals at the end of the round?
 


Last edited:

Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
Beginner's silly question(s) time.

I need to get my handicap sorted so I'm going to have a go at scoring myself for the first time this weekend (I don't have a score book yet, so for now I'm going to print some score sheets from the internet). It seems that each row on a typical score card has space for recording two ends - half a dozen arrows each. Is there a reason for recording scores and running totals two ends at a time, other than to save space on the page? It would seem more logical to score each end on a separate row!

How do I record scores for 3-arrow ends - would I still record two ends per row, but enter arrow scores into the first 3 boxes and leave the remaining 3 blank? Then total up each row in the usual way?

And what happens when scoring a large round, e.g. a FITA 18 with 20 ends? I'm assuming score cards have enough room (they generally seem to have at least 10 rows of 2 ends each)! I've noticed some score cards have a "totals" row after every 4 or 5 normal rows. Is there any requirement to fill these in or just fill in the grand totals at the end of the round?
Most score cards I've seen have enough room to allow for a dozen arrows to be scored per line, breaking it in half to ease addition. As for reason......I suppose it's easier to count in dozens rather than half dozens.
The total rows after a certain number of normal rows could be for different distances, as general ones are designed for both indoor and outdoor use.
When shooting FITA 18 or Portsmouth, just enter them in as normal 6 number for the first box six for the 2nd.
 


andyste1

New member
When shooting FITA 18 or Portsmouth, just enter them in as normal 6 number for the first box six for the 2nd.
So to clarify, when shooting 3-arrow ends indoors are you saying that I write down the individual arrow scores one after the other until I've filled a row with a dozen scores (i.e. 4 x 3-arrow ends), before totalling up and starting on the next row?
 


Raven's_Eye

Active member
Ironman
So to clarify, when shooting 3-arrow ends indoors are you saying that I write down the individual arrow scores one after the other until I've filled a row with a dozen scores (i.e. 4 x 3-arrow ends), before totalling up and starting on the next row?
Depending on the layout of the score card but usually it's write down two ends then give total of the 6. Write down next two ends then give total of those 6 then total of 12. Then start new line.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I think for three arrows.... write down 3 scores then another three scores, and add up the half dozen scores. Then repeat for the second half dozen scores... on the same line.. then add the two half dozens.
 


ThomVis

Member

At FITA indoor, shoot 3 arrows, add up three arrows.
At FITA outdoor longer distances, shoot 6 arrows, add up six arrows. Shorter distances: Same or same as FITA indoor, depending on organization.

The bloke in the picture is Sjef van den Berg who shot a Junior World record 18m 60arrows on October 19th.
Previous record from 2009 was 595 shot by Australian Ryan Tyack.
 


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