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PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

52BIGSBY

Member
Hello,
I have managed to obtain a 7' log of yew, seasoned standing but requiring seasoning in the lower 20". Band saw cutting proved impossible as it did not want to "go" where I wanted it... probably lack of tool skill. I then got my preferred tool that I am good with, the trusty chainsaw, and cut the log in two with that. (2 1/2" & 4" at the ends). This has done a pretty good job, giving the thicker side with only a couple of tiny knots well off centre along the length.
There is a slight lateral bend at one end, and a small bow with slight twist causing a hollow on the flat side. To deal with this I have Tied it up and firmly secured it to a rafter in my garage flat side to the beam. At the point where it has the biggest gap between the flat side of the log and the beam I have started to apply pressure with a G clamp with protection to the wood provided by an old suede gardening glove. I am then left with the end foot (thin end) which rises a little. To this I have hung a 56lb weight I have laying about.
My (probably ridiculous) expectation is that the clamp can be slowly tightened as the wood moves to a flatter (to the beam) position, and that the weight will slowly bring the end in line.
I am doing this because I consider that it might make life easier when cutting the bow shape equidistent to the centre line, resulting in an even heartwood/sapwood ratio across the limbs.
Please tell me if I am going horribly wrong......I might add more clamps if I can borrow a couple big enough.
Thank you,
Richard.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Clamping it prob won't do much good... won't do much harm either! :)
You can lay a bow out straight on a yew log even if it has some slight bend, following the grain is vital on some woods, but Yew is V forgiving (up to the point where it goes bang... you need to back off a tad from there ;) )
Bandsaws need plenty of fiddling to get 'em running true and a coarse blade with alternate set teeth for ripping down logs (3tpi AS), even then they can still wander.
Del
 

WillS

New member
That's one of the reasons I always split a log, instead of trying to cut it. Well, that and the fact I haven't got a bandsaw or chainsaw ;) That said, I've got 3 or 4 huge 10ft x 20" yew logs coming in soon - they might tempt me to buy a bandsaw after all....

Seriously though, if you take your time with a couple of good axes and some wedges, you can direct a split pretty much anywhere you want it - you also have the peace of mind knowing it's following the grain (unless you're deliberately forcing it not to) and the bow will come out as close to the natural shape of the wood as possible which minimises the chance of breaking. Splitting vs sawing often divides camps however, so just go with what you feel most comfortable with.

As Del said - the clamping won't do much, if anything. Take it off the rafter, lay out the bow profile and cut it down to a roughed out stave. At that point, you might find it's dead straight (or you might be able to lay it out dead straight) and if not, it'll be a piece of cake to straighten once it's only a few inches wide and thick.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
@ WillS
20" Yew logs :shocked: you'll need a sawmill rather than a bandsaw for those bad boys...
I'd be interested to see pics
Del
And if you need a hand processing 'em... ;)
 

WillS

New member
Yeah I'm not quite sure what to do with them.. I might kerf cut them, then split once they've opened a bit. Wouldn't trust myself using a saw of any kind on something that special!

I could have bought the lot, but some were over 30" wide. All from the same tree, 14 tonnes of the straightest, tightest-grained yew I've ever seen.
 

WillS

New member
Here's a pic. You don't come across yew like this very often! Every piece you can see is 10ft or over.

 

WillS

New member
I think whatever I didn't take has been had by other bowyers at this point. I'm going up again to the yard this week, I'll see if there's any not accounted for, but most of it was marked up last time I was there.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Ok, that's great that it's going to bowyers ... :)
I was just worried it would end up as fire wood :(.

I've just never had a chance to work Yew from a big trunk. Well I s'pose I've had stuff 10" diameter...
I bet some of the inner timber will make superb bellies.
If you sell any of the inner stuff on I'm up for a length just to see how it is.
Cheers
Del
 
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