Having trouble with compound blade rest - blade selection issue?

jonUK76

Member
I've not long started shooting compound (had one a couple of months) and I'm mainly a recurve shooter, but I like to vary it a bit... It's going well mostly, but on occasion I have a lot of trouble with the arrow falling off the rest during the draw, particularly after I've been shooting a while. I think my draw becomes a little less smooth as my muscles tire and it really doesn't take much to have the arrow wobble off this rest. The rest is a Mybo Horizon launcher.

I'm wondering if perhaps the blade I'm using is not helping. I'm using the supplied standard blade (0.010" thickness, standard width). There's a diagram on the link above showing the different blade widths precisely. My arrows are Easton 2016 Platinum Plus with a total arrow weight of 405 grains. With these arrows would I be better off with the Wide blade? There's also the option of getting a heavier 0.012" blade, or should I stick with 0.010"?

I note another manufacturer recommends the thicker blades for arrows over 400 grains.

Thanks for any tips.
 


bimble

Well-known member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
for 2016s a wider blade would help in stopping bounce offs, they are a fairly wide shaft and it doesn't take a lot of bawhand tension to get them to bounce off. The 10 thou blade should be fine, I've shot +500gn arrows off of them before. But if you're having to buy a new blade to get a wider one, there's no harm in getting the 12 thou blade. Just in case you decide to try heavier points/arrows at a later date.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I agree about the wider rest.
Sometimes the arrows fall off because the archer's draw is not smooth. At the start of the draw the arms are not always in a very good position for drawing smoothly. If the draw weight is just a bit too high it can make things worse. If you unwind both limbs by one turn, just to get the feeling right,and get some smooth draws happening then wind them back up when you feel more confident.
 


jonUK76

Member
Thanks Geoff. I can turn the weight down a little (limited range, but down to 40 lbs which is similar to what I shoot on recurve). One thing I feel I need to improve is the early part of the draw as you say, and on this bow I believe there is very little movement before you get the peak draw weight, which is obviously the opposite of a recurve which is much more gradual. I find I'm using my shoulder muscles in the early part of the draw more than I probably should.
 


jerryRTD

Active member
You should be using your shoulder muscles throughout the draw, the alternative is to use the arm muscles which is generally regarded as wrong. You should be using the shoulder muscles to move the upper arm when you draw. I seem to remember Geoff having a release aid that strapped to the elbow so the arm muscles could not be used to draw with.
Check your nocking point is not too tight ; that can cause the arrow to be light at the point when drawing. Also don't hold the release in a death grip, let action of drawing align everything rather than pull it out of line.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
One of the things that helps me start the draw on my compound, is to start with both hands at eye level. Also, the draw elbow is level with the hands.
Because the bow is not drawn at that starting position, the hands are not one behind the other, as they sometimes appear with recurve. The draw hand is off to the right of the bow hand for RH archer. When the draw starts it is the draw elbow that moves first, and the draw hand follows on. Gradually, the draw hand swings round towards the face and the string lands up in front of the aiming eye. By that time the elbow has brought everything in line and the string is on the jaw, with the hand making its anchor position nice and solid.
If you try to start the draw with one hand behind the other in line with your eye, you will have to use the weaker biceps to keep them in line and that makes for a weak start to the draw and often a shaky one, too.
 


jonUK76

Member
Thanks. Nice to see the site back.

Jerry, I think the nock points may have been a little tight so I've made some room. Thanks for the suggestion. I'll see if it makes any difference when I practise later. I've also ordered some wide blades so hopefully that will improve things too. Regarding my comment on shoulder muscles, my understanding was that ideally you want the back muscles to be doing most of the work while drawing rather than shoulder or arm muscles. That is what I'm trying to say. Certainly the shoulder is where I feel start to tire when my draw gets shakier. With my recurve I don't seem to have the problem, probably because my technique on that is better.

Geoff, I do use a high draw on recurve (on the suggestion of my coach). I'll see if I can work it out on compound. I guess on the face of it, it should be the same, but the high weight very early in the draw cycle throws me a bit compared to what I'm more used to.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
When you do the high draw, can I clarify that you have both hands level with your eye? Once upon a time high draw meant the bow arm was pointing upwards, as was the arrow; DANGEROUS!
Almost everyone I have handed my compound to for them to try to draw, has failed. It isn't just the initial stiffness, but the fact they expect it to get harder, just like pulling any other type of bow or even stretchy bands. With that increase in stiffness in their heads, they stop pulling.It is exactly the same for me after nearly 30 years on compounds; if I am handed a compound that is just a few pounds higher in weight. I struggle unnecessarily. When you think it is going to be too stiff, it is easy to simply stop pulling and hand the bow back to its owner.
It is the same sort of thing with a draw weight that is just a bit too high. We get used to thinking it is too stiff and we struggle and do things in a way that doesn't help. Dropping the weight a couple of pounds can make so much difference. Then we can start to relax and draw properly. When relaxed and drawing well, we can soon go back to a higher weight; but continue with the new and better drawing form.
 


jonUK76

Member
Yes, both hands raised lowering down, not the "sky draw". I'll take your advice and drop the draw weight as far as I can. Thanks Geoff.
 


jonUK76

Member
Just as an update I had a quick practise at the lower 40 lb draw weight, shooting about 6 dozen arrows into a blank boss over the course of an hour. I used the slightly high draw, and it's definitely a lot better - I can feel the load is going onto the back muscles much earlier like that. No shoulder pain at the time or today. I had the arrow fall off maybe only twice over the period on the standard blade, so a definite improvement.
 


GoneBad

Member
A red Launchtec blade is a lot less bouncy than a metal blade.
I also find drawing to a place 4 inches away from the jaw and then swinging into anchor helps. If you draw directly to your jaw it adds extra load to the muscles.
 


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