How quickly does a beginner outgrow limbs?

deaglesuk

New member
Morning folks,

I'm about to take my last session of my beginners class tonight (a mock tournament to teach us about scoring I believe) and have already signed up to join the club as soon as it finishes (going on Wednesday night to do the paperwork, get keys for the range etc etc). I've purchased a lot of my own gear already, pretty much everything baring Limbs, Arrows and a string. All of which I'm loaning from the club for a 3 month period.

Now I'm well aware that I need to start with lower poundage limbs (I'm expecting to be given 26lb ish as a start) and I'm also not too worried about getting to a certain poundage (it's just a number, who cares right?). But in 3 months time I will be expected to go out and buy my own limbs and arrows, I guess my question is how long are those limbs I get in 3 months going to take me to grow out of? The plan is to shoot 3 times a week for 3 hours ish a time, indoor at first but as soon as the light and weather improves I'd like to start looking at moving outside. Am I going to be buying 28 - 30lb limbs in 3 months and then outgrowing them in 3 months? 6 months? a year? I don't mind buying limbs really, the cheaper ones are cheap enough to replace but replacing fulls sets of arrows at the same time might get pricey (I may have been eyeing up ACCs for when I move outside) if I have to do it too often.
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
That's impossible to say. 3 x 3hr/wk is a good amount of shooting but in a years time you may be at 40lb or you may be at 28lb. It very much depends of physical attributes, age and, especially, good form. Good form allows you to draw heavier draw weights using the back muscles and maintain control of the shot. And progress will be different for each individual.
A measure control is if you can execute the last shot of a 3hr session with the same control as the first. And it's way too early to be buying ACCs
 


deaglesuk

New member
That's impossible to say. 3 x 3hr/wk is a good amount of shooting but in a years time you may be at 40lb or you may be at 28lb. It very much depends of physical attributes, age and, especially, good form. Good form allows you to draw heavier draw weights using the back muscles and maintain control of the shot. And progress will be different for each individual.
A measure control is if you can execute the last shot of a 3hr session with the same control as the first. And it's way too early to be buying ACCs
Thanks for the response. I guess "it's impossible to say" makes sense really. I guess it's a conversation I need to have when the time comes with 1 of the experienced archers at my club who've seen me shoot (2 of my planned 3 hour sessions are "intermediate classes").

Have you any tips on what sort of arrow I should be considering when I move outside? I'm told Alu / Carbon is the way to go but can't see many that have the mix, most seem to be full carbon?
 


KidCurry

Well-known member
Easton aluminium xx75 are excellent arrows. They are relatively cheap, very well made and very consistent. They will also behave more predictably than carbon and carbon/alu for a new archer.
 


deaglesuk

New member
Easton aluminium xx75 are excellent arrows. They are relatively cheap, very well made and very consistent. They will also behave more predictably than carbon and carbon/alu for a new archer.
Thank you. I did eye those up as "indoor arrows" :)
 


fbirder

Supporter
Supporter
Have you any tips on what sort of arrow I should be considering when I move outside? I'm told Alu / Carbon is the way to go but can't see many that have the mix, most seem to be full carbon?
As well as changing the poundage you can comfortably shoot you will find your draw length will change. The arrows you buy will change as those two parameters change. So there's not much point buying expensive arrows until your draw weight and length are settled.

Once that's happened I would recommend Easton ACCs as a good compromise between cost and performance.
 


deaglesuk

New member
As well as changing the poundage you can comfortably shoot you will find your draw length will change. The arrows you buy will change as those two parameters change. So there's not much point buying expensive arrows until your draw weight and length are settled.

Once that's happened I would recommend Easton ACCs as a good compromise between cost and performance.
Thanks fbirder. I spoke to people at the club, they agree and said to just grab a dozen Easton Platinum XX75 spined to match the limbs I buy and not to warry about it too much
 


chuffalump

Member
If you find you can shoot the full three hours without struggling to draw or the slightest ache then upping poundage is definitely indicated. Generally its common sense though. Is this easy? Am I running out of adjustment on the sight bar? It's your archery and shelling out 50 quid for the next step up wont kill you if it's too soon. Keep the old limbs until you are happy with the new.

You can buy fancy limbs when you settle.
 


deaglesuk

New member
Thanks for the comment Chuffalump, makes perfect sense. I shot 100 arrows last night with 26lb on the fingers. Was definitely done by the time I finished (although don't feel bad today). Spoke to the club equipment guy and I can swap out my loan limbs whenever I like in the next 3 months, anything I want to try from 20lb - 32lb. I guess I'll decide what to grab in 3 months
 


LAC Mark

Member
It's generally recommended to go up in 2lbs increments, however it all depends on you and how easy your finding your current poundage.
 


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