Hoyt pro medalist td3

John blund

New member
Hi. I'm new to the forum, and this is my first post.
I have a 40 year old Hoyt pro medalist td3 that I absolutely love, but I have problems with the string. It is a 66 inc bow, braice height is recomended from 8 1/4 to 8 3/4. I am using dacron b50 strings, but the string for 66 inch bow is streching so much that the braice height is going down to about 7 inches after a couple of hundred shots. I have twisted the string about 50 turns, and it still streches. When using a 64 string, the braice height is 9 2/4. Can I use any other type of string on this bow? I fear the limb tips will split if using strings like fast flight. Any suggestions?
John
 

jerryRTD

Well-known member
Hi. I'm new to the forum, and this is my first post.
I have a 40 year old Hoyt pro medalist td3 that I absolutely love, but I have problems with the string. It is a 66 inc bow, braice height is recomended from 8 1/4 to 8 3/4. I am using dacron b50 strings, but the string for 66 inch bow is streching so much that the braice height is going down to about 7 inches after a couple of hundred shots. I have twisted the string about 50 turns, and it still streches. When using a 64 string, the braice height is 9 2/4. Can I use any other type of string on this bow? I fear the limb tips will split if using strings like fast flight. Any suggestions?
John
You are probably not going to want to hear this ,but I think its time to retire you present bow .
 

Stretch

Active member
You are probably not going to want to hear this ,but I think its time to retire you present bow .
I don’t agree. If the OP is only shooting occasionally for fun, the TD3 is very capable if you stick with Dacron and heavier arrows. It does need to be treated as “old” so inspected regularly etc. Bubbling in paint work means retire me now. Ultimately, if it breaks it is very unlikely to cause anyone any harm.

The string question is not going to be cheap though as you probably need to go to a custom string maker (if you don’t know anyone who can make a much shorter string).

Mind you I have shot strings with more than 50 twists :p but you’re 1 1/4” off so probably too many. It does seem that the original string was either too long in the first place or has stretched more than it should. Dacron stretches a lot… but not that much. A different brand dacron may be worth a try but you’d need to talk to (or visit) a dealer.

Stretch
 

Berny

Active member
The TD3 was sold with Dacron or Kevlar strings, the latter being the low-stretch string of the day
(fast flight not on the market 'til ~'87).
As i understand it, the problem with kevlar was that the string would break rather than the more recent
phenomenon of nocks splitting or limbs breaking with low/non-stretch strings, although this latter
event may have more to do with non-stretch strings, skinny strings, low weight arrows, over bracing & overdrawing?

So if a bow could take kevlar why can't it take a modern low-stretch string?
Perhaps with suitable care it can, there are plenty who claim they've been doing it with older bows from as far back
as the '60s & even the '50s - with care. Typically, padded loops (to obviate the ripping through the nock)
& one assumes a "proper" weight arrow, with proper brace height & sticking within the manufacturers recommended
draw length.

As flemish twist strings are reckoned to be gentler than endless-loop, why not try (carefully) with one of those
in 100% dyneema e.g. FF+, 8125, 8190 or even D97, taking care to consider those other attributes as identified above?
 

John blund

New member
You are probably not going to want to hear this ,but I think its time to retire you present bow .
I will try to solve the string problem and keep this bow. It has no vibration at all, and shoots really well. I came back to archery this august after a 38 years long break and are allready shooting 275 (30 arrows) at 20 yards on a 40 cm target. Nothing wrong with the bow
 

John blund

New member
I don’t agree. If the OP is only shooting occasionally for fun, the TD3 is very capable if you stick with Dacron and heavier arrows. It does need to be treated as “old” so inspected regularly etc. Bubbling in paint work means retire me now. Ultimately, if it breaks it is very unlikely to cause anyone any harm.

The string question is not going to be cheap though as you probably need to go to a custom string maker (if you don’t know anyone who can make a much shorter string).

Mind you I have shot strings with more than 50 twists :p but you’re 1 1/4” off so probably too many. It does seem that the original string was either too long in the first place or has stretched more than it should. Dacron stretches a lot… but not that much. A different brand dacron may be worth a try but you’d need to talk to (or visit) a dealer.

Stretch
I have tried 4 different dacron b50 strings (2 for 66 inch bow and 2 for 64 inch) with the same result. The longer strings are streching to much, and the shorter strings not enough. I don't make strings, and don't know anyone who does. Thats why I wondered about never material strings with less strech.
Hoyt recomended a 63,25 inch string, but that is not being sold in my country.
In winter I schoot maybe 500 arrows a week, but in summer maybe 1000 a week.
The bow is in very good condition.
 

John blund

New member
The TD3 was sold with Dacron or Kevlar strings, the latter being the low-stretch string of the day
(fast flight not on the market 'til ~'87).
As i understand it, the problem with kevlar was that the string would break rather than the more recent
phenomenon of nocks splitting or limbs breaking with low/non-stretch strings, although this latter
event may have more to do with non-stretch strings, skinny strings, low weight arrows, over bracing & overdrawing?

So if a bow could take kevlar why can't it take a modern low-stretch string?
Perhaps with suitable care it can, there are plenty who claim they've been doing it with older bows from as far back
as the '60s & even the '50s - with care. Typically, padded loops (to obviate the ripping through the nock)
& one assumes a "proper" weight arrow, with proper brace height & sticking within the manufacturers recommended
draw length.

As flemish twist strings are reckoned to be gentler than endless-loop, why not try (carefully) with one of those
in 100% dyneema e.g. FF+, 8125, 8190 or even D97, taking care to consider those other attributes as identified above?
Thanks for your suggestions.
 

Stretch

Active member
It’s a cast Magnesium riser that is more than 35 years old. I’d stick with Dacron or the riser may fail. However, it will probably shoot well with low stretch materials until that point. If that is OK and you’re happy to replace it if/when it goes, any older spec Dyneema would work. Angel, Fastflite, Spectra 652 would be first choices; 8125, Dy97, FF+ have a bit less stretch but not much in it. So SK65 base or SK75.

If you do go Dyneema shoot it with a few more twists.

Have you thought about making or buying a string jig and making your own?

BTW Kevlar broke because of the structure of the fibre, it lasted about 1000 shots and then just went. As I recall it was actually lower stretch. It killed plenty of risers and limbs that were supposed to be OK with it. I have a Marksman KG1 (new in 1988) that was supposed to be suitable for Kevlar and Fastflite but it lasted 18 months and snapped. Cast Aluminium, not Magnesium but… it is now a door handle.

Stretch
 

John blund

New member
It’s a cast Magnesium riser that is more than 35 years old. I’d stick with Dacron or the riser may fail. However, it will probably shoot well with low stretch materials until that point. If that is OK and you’re happy to replace it if/when it goes, any older spec Dyneema would work. Angel, Fastflite, Spectra 652 would be first choices; 8125, Dy97, FF+ have a bit less stretch but not much in it. So SK65 base or SK75.

If you do go Dyneema shoot it with a few more twists.

Have you thought about making or buying a string jig and making your own?

BTW Kevlar broke because of the structure of the fibre, it lasted about 1000 shots and then just went. As I recall it was actually lower stretch. It killed plenty of risers and limbs that were supposed to be OK with it. I have a Marksman KG1 (new in 1988) that was supposed to be suitable for Kevlar and Fastflite but it lasted 18 months and snapped. Cast Aluminium, not Magnesium but… it is now a door handle.

Stretch
Thanks. I've had this bow for 41 years. I think I will stick with dacron. Maybe i'll get in touch with another club and see if someone there makes strings. If not I have to keep twisting.
 

Corax67

Well-known member
Thanks. I've had this bow for 41 years. I think I will stick with dacron. Maybe i'll get in touch with another club and see if someone there makes strings. If not I have to keep twisting.
Finding a club is a great idea - we make all our own club strings, everything from short beginner junior bow strings up to 75” longbow and everything in between plus strings for members in a variety of materials.

Hopefully you’ll find a local club who do the same and can help you out
 
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