just received this

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Ironman
The 'Copy & Steal Everything' Guide to Coaching
Shooting Forward, April 2009.

Rugby and archery: Same coach, different sport?

Rugby and archery aren?t two sports you?d automatically put together. Look a little bit closer though and is there really that much difference between a rugby and archery coach? To be a great coach, it?s not just the technical skills you need to master.

The modern coach relies on a variety of skills to create an enjoyable sporting environment and nurture talent. Shooting Forward caught up with professional rugby coaches from England 7?s and Bees Rugby to learn more about the core skills coaches from any sport need to develop.

Russell Earnshaw (below right) is assistant coach of England 7?s and head coach of National Division Two league leaders Bees Rugby.

Andy Daish (below left) heads the Bees Rugby Community Team working with community groups across Birmingham & Solihull.



if you read the full page these two gents make sense in some things they say,but where's the professional archery coaches. and one of them is a PE teacher so he has a degree.

if you read the full page on the gnas website i'm sure that this is a p### take on the uksc system

(Andy) In my opinion the main key skill you need to coach children is to have the ability to break down complicated rugby skills into small steps.

how many archery coaches can do this. considering virtually all archers are differant shapes etc
 

Shink

New member
how many archery coaches can do this. considering virtually all archers are differant shapes etc
I'm certainly no coach, so might be very wrong here but...

Isn't the point that coaching children requires specific teaching styles? Rather than the specific skills, this blurb seems to be saying that the psychology of teaching effectively transfers across different sports.

Coaching methods "including videos (preview and feed-forward), ?walk-throughs? ... classroom, individual/ unit / team sessions and sessions where I create match-pressure)." ... this certainly seems to be applicable to archery.

I definitely think that coaching form is only one part of coaching for competitive archery.

And as far as form goes, we're all different but we're using the same number of limbs and eyes (except for obvious variations) and using the same equipment - which is also true of rugby.

Again, ignore if I'm out to lunch :)
 

not dead yet

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Ironman
I'm certainly no coach, so might be very wrong here but...

Isn't the point that coaching children requires specific teaching styles? Rather than the specific skills, this blurb seems to be saying that the psychology of teaching effectively transfers across different sports.

Coaching methods "including videos (preview and feed-forward), ?walk-throughs? ... classroom, individual/ unit / team sessions and sessions where I create match-pressure)." ... this certainly seems to be applicable to archery.

I definitely think that coaching form is only one part of coaching for competitive archery.

And as far as form goes, we're all different but we're using the same number of limbs and eyes (except for obvious variations) and using the same equipment - which is also true of rugby.

Again, ignore if I'm out to lunch :)
the point i was trying to make was " how many coaches can break down complicated archery skills. and which equipment is the same for archery and rugby.

swimming is the nearest to archery. using the same muscle group
 

Robin the Hood

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With the technical points they make, I would be interested in what Class coach they are?.... :scratchch

Paul....
:relieved:
 

Big Dave

New member
the problem with coaching children is they do not fully understand how there bodys work and the muscle's used in archery are not often used even by adults so trying to make a child understand how to use them will be tricky. a good example of making a muscle move that you never use is to try tenseing one of your pectorial muscles in time with some music not many of us can do that.
I'm not a coach this is a view based on my own observations.
 

moo-mop

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Many many years ago I did rugby rather a lot as a kid (you can tell to this day if you look at my ear). The main difference is such a large component of rugby is the tactics involved in team sport, and tactics also play a very big role in other individual sports I've done like sailing. These don't apply in the same way to archery which is a repetitive skill [edit: the reason this is important is that tactics can often be covered away from the actual doing of the sport eg in the classroom].
 
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Rhys

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Still in terms of skills a junior rugby coach also has to teach people how to scrum, ruck, lineout, kick goals etc...
 

not dead yet

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Ironman
Many many years ago I did rugby rather a lot as a kid (you can tell to this day if you look at my ear). The main difference is such a large component of rugby is the tactics involved in team sport, and tactics also play a very big role in other individual sports I've done like sailing. These don't apply in the same way to archery which is a repetitive skill [edit: the reason this is important is that tactics can often be covered away from the actual doing of the sport eg in the classroom].
that is a good point, moomop.

big daves scenario. how many kids do you know that have developed pectoral muscles.

without going back to the news letter ,i dont think it was all about children, just that the 2 coaches involved coached children also.
its a mine field

pete
 
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