loading the arrow onto the bow. RECURVE

LionOfNarnia

Supporter
Supporter
I'd say physique has as much to do with it as preference, as I said much earlier 'bow-on-toe' is WAY too low for me to use efficiently - at least 4-5 inches compared with 'hanging'.

- The idea of making an 'ankle stirrup' has me intrigued though. May give that a whirl after this 'compo-fortnite' is over, it appeals to the (former) engineer in me ;)
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Think of the money you could make if you could design one that does a great job while looking as if there is a lot of science involved, along with many expensive materials.
If you could rest your performance drink on it while sitting down during the breaks you could get sponsors and adverts on tv. Special bottles could be made to fit your design, possibly.
How about wellies with a special hollow fitted inside the tops?
 


LionOfNarnia

Supporter
Supporter
I never think in terms of making money Geoff
- S'prolly why I've always been so poor.

The wellies though - I'm a Cumbrian so modifying wellies to hold 'somewhat rod-shaped' objects is not so much a perversion as a competitive sport ;)

- The Welsh are also acknowledged masters of this art, as are these dudes ;)

[video=youtube_share;SWWi7asCu-4]https://youtu.be/SWWi7asCu-4[/video]
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I'm a Cumbrian, too.
The wellies could be modified for archery and when past their sell by date, could be re purposed for the sport of welly throwing; or garden features; or sliced up to make super arrow pullers.
All you need is to advertise them as having been worn by................................Percy Thrower, Compo, Andy Pandy.
 


Berny

Member
FrankBilson-Nocking (Medium).jpg
Illn. 4 as Frank Bilson nocked .... & Ann Marston .... & Tom Foy ....
Always looked awkward to me but they all shot rather well, so it's nothing to do with how you nock ;-)
 


Emmadragon

Supporter
Supporter
I get astride the line, make sure my feet are where they should be. Then I raise the bow to a diagonal position where the nocking point is at a comfortable height for me to load the arrow (so the lower end is about knee level, I'm reasonably tall). The limbs are vertically oriented, so the diagonal means the long rod is tipped forward. I 'slot' the arrow through the string, load the nock onto the string and position the arrow onto the arrow rest. At this point the bow is just to the left of my forward knee (I am right-handed). I then position my fingers in the grip on the string, and move the bow slightly so that the lower end is to the right of my forward knee, putting it in a more vertical position before I 'set' myself and start to draw. Moving the bow to that slightly more forward position reduces my tendency to cant the bow, and means that I don't have to rotate my shoulder to get the bow at the correct angle. Rotating shoulders are bad news for me, it causes a lot of pain. I hope that's a clear enough description to make sense.
 


geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Yes, very clear. Thanks.
I started the thread to find out if anyone loaded their arrow onto their bow with some aim in mind connected to their scoring. It seems most of us go for a method that we find comfortable or simple.
 


malbro

Instinctive Archer
Supporter
I shoot a 62" barebow style so resting on my foot would be awkward, I basically use the same technique as
I get astride the line, make sure my feet are where they should be. Then I raise the bow to a diagonal position where the nocking point is at a comfortable height for me to load the arrow (so the lower end is about knee level, I'm reasonably tall). The limbs are vertically oriented, so the diagonal means the long rod is tipped forward. I 'slot' the arrow through the string, load the nock onto the string and position the arrow onto the arrow rest.
except I am a leftie and also shoot from the shelf. When shooting field I tend to hold the bow at an angle across the body but for target keep it vertical, you generally have more room on a field course. Nobody mentioned resting on the foot during training, though my first trainer was field not target.

Incidently watching other methods of loading the arrow seem awkward in comparison to loading the arrow through the bow and string, though this method can result in the occasional contact between arrow tip and the riser, until you have plenty of practice.
 


Top