Loop serving with string material.

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
I just made a recurve endless string for a friend. While I was serving the tails of the loops I was thinking about serving materials. Diamondback is not a low cost material and I used to use braided fishing line for my endless loop strings. I was wondering if the tails of the loops (which I serve separately from the loop section) could be completed using something like Dacron string material or a similar stronger bow string material? By the way I do not charge for my strings for friends.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I serve all the loops on my strings with the string I am using for the bowstring itself. In fact , I wind the strings round two posts, and then wind one tail round the loop I am forming, then serve enough to start drawing the two side of the loop together. Then use serving thread for the section that runs down the limb tip in the groove or round the cam on compound. The other tail end is used to wind round the string to form the other loop. The string jig only needs two posts.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
Thanks for the quick reply geoffretired. I thought it must be possible as the Flemish twist strings I make are all the same material for loops and main string. Also. The 'Friskney Bowmen' method utilizes the string material to serve the loops. I know the loop sections around the limb tips must take some wear and I use serving material in that section (braided fishing line). But I was thinking that the tail section merely pulls the strands together to form the loop. Dacron B50, 8125 or other string material (such as the ends of spools where the is not enough to make a complete endless loop string) would provide a lower cost option for me.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
When I stopped serving the loops, I did nothing to the strands and they tended to separate when removed from the bow. Putting them back on meant sometimes one or two loops were missed and I had to re-string the bow, which was a fiddle. However, I don't remember ever having a bare loop break. The reason I started the Friskney method was just to keep the loop together for easier stringing. Prior to that, as an interim measure, I put a short narrow strip of duck tape round the extremity of the loop just to hold the strands together. The sides of the loop were bare.
The reason I did unserved loops in the first place was because a more experienced archer( I was new to archery then) explained that under the serving, the bow string can wear away and cause a break before we see any signs; with no serving, he could see if the loop was showing signs of wear and get in first.
That was in the days of Kevlar which was notorious for breaking without warning.
I have unserved loops on my compound and the loops show no signs of wear, although they don't really move on the pegs.
What I think is, that if the strings showed any damage as a result of not serving in the usual places, with the usual material then at least we would see it in good time to take action.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
When I stopped serving the loops, I did nothing to the strands and they tended to separate when removed from the bow. Putting them back on meant sometimes one or two loops were missed and I had to re-string the bow, which was a fiddle. However, I don't remember ever having a bare loop break. The reason I started the Friskney method was just to keep the loop together for easier stringing. Prior to that, as an interim measure, I put a short narrow strip of duck tape round the extremity of the loop just to hold the strands together. The sides of the loop were bare.
The reason I did unserved loops in the first place was because a more experienced archer( I was new to archery then) explained that under the serving, the bow string can wear away and cause a break before we see any signs; with no serving, he could see if the loop was showing signs of wear and get in first.
That was in the days of Kevlar which was notorious for breaking without warning.
I have unserved loops on my compound and the loops show no signs of wear, although they don't really move on the pegs.
What I think is, that if the strings showed any damage as a result of not serving in the usual places, with the usual material then at least we would see it in good time to take action.
 

dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
AIUK Saviour
Can anyone post the instructions to the 'Friskney Bowmen' method? I've heard references to it before but never been able to find a decent description of it.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
dvd8n. When you wind the continuous loop string onto your jig you make sure that you leave a 'LONG' tail at the start (12"). Wind the string for the number of strands you need and leave another 'LONG' tail before you cut the remaining string material off. Rotate your two post (if you are not just using a two post jig) end as if you were going to serve in the usual method with a serving tool and spool of serving material. Take both of the 'tails' you created from their 'tie-off points' on your jig so you have one in each hand. Bring each to the middle of the loop section and cross them over (otherwise you will not be able to serve them around the 'loop' section strand bundle) and secure one of them. Now start winding the 'tail' from the middle to the outside post, just like serving with a tool until you have the length of the loop you want. Secure that tail and do the same with the other tail. They will be served in opposite directions. Rotate the jig posts so they are aligned again (and the main string bundles are together). Now grasp both tail ends and serve the tail section of the loop for the length required. When I used this method I served the tail using a 'cross-over' method using both tails at the same time and coming from opposite sides - so it looks similar to braiding. At the end of the tail I used a short section of string material to make a small 'whip finish' to secure the ends of the two tails. The other loop, because it does not have any 'ends' can be served in the 'usual manner' using another length of string material. OR. You can find the centre position of this loop and the middle of a separate length of string material, take a half-turn around the middle of main string bundle with the 'separate piece' and serve one side of the loop 'under then over' and the other half loop 'over then under' (in opposite directions). When you have the loop length you want. Rotate the jig posts, as previously, and finish the tail in the same manner as the first loop.

Crikey that was harder to describe that it is to do!
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
The version I watched is no longer available on their website. I was told that the guy who dealt with their website was really ill and no one was able to put the video back on after it was removed.( Don't know why it was removed, perhaps a new website was set up??)
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
The version I watched is no longer available on their website. I was told that the guy who dealt with their website was really ill and no one was able to put the video back on after it was removed.( Don't know why it was removed, perhaps a new website was set up??)
Yes geoff. I tried to find that video but as you say it was not available. I did my first attempt from your original description and figured it out from there.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Albatross, I have been doing a lot of thinking regarding the serving of loops, and not serving them.
Not serving them has done no damage to bow or string in all the time i have left them unserved.
Using a little bit of tape to hold each loop together certainly make it easier to string the bow.
The Friskney method is very neat and gets rid of the sometimes ugly bulge where all three layers of serving materials meet.
Currently; I am thinking of a simpler way to get the Friskney results. There are simpler ways.... I am just thinking how best to explain it in words.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Albatross, I have been doing a lot of thinking regarding the serving of loops, and not serving them.
Not serving them has done no damage to bow or string in all the time i have left them unserved.
Using a little bit of tape to hold each loop together certainly make it easier to string the bow.
The Friskney method is very neat and gets rid of the sometimes ugly bulge where all three layers of serving materials meet.
Currently; I am thinking of a simpler way to get the Friskney results. There are simpler ways.... I am just thinking how best to explain it in words.
 

TJ Mason

Soaring
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
American Shoot
I just made a recurve endless string for a friend. While I was serving the tails of the loops I was thinking about serving materials. Diamondback is not a low cost material and I used to use braided fishing line for my endless loop strings. I was wondering if the tails of the loops (which I serve separately from the loop section) could be completed using something like Dacron string material or a similar stronger bow string material? By the way I do not charge for my strings for friends.
This will be fine if the nocks on the limbs are very smooth and rounded, but the serving may be prone to fraying if there is any roughness or sharpness. Diamondback stands up to rougher surfaces better than string material does, in my experience.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
What I have done in the past is get a shoe lace and rub in some very fine abrasive paste ( metal polish fine)
Then wrap the lace round the limb nocks a bit like wrapping a towel over your back, when you dry your back. Rubbing the lace back and forth in the grooves, not only smoothes them, but also tells you when they are smooth, as the lace slides so easily at that stage.
 

ThomVis

Member
When I stopped serving the loops, I did nothing to the strands and they tended to separate when removed from the bow. Putting them back on meant sometimes one or two loops were missed and I had to re-string the bow, which was a fiddle.
5 minutes saved on making a string, something to watch out for each time you string/destring the bow. I serve my end loops with Brownell #4, cheap and easy to apply.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi ThomVis. Could you just clarify that please? I mean, do you serve the loops in the normal way, between two posts on the jig?
 
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