Painting a riser

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

nbuuifx

Member
My daughter has a gloss pink riser, but now pink is not cool 🙄.

I've seen plastidip type paints that you can spray on and if it doesn't work out, then you can peel it off and return to normal.

Had anyone tried this type of paint on a riser? Do you think it would last? It might get a few marks from fletchings etc but the rest should be ok.

Any thoughts appreciated.
 

bimble

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is it a painted riser? If it is you can always sand off the old paint and get it sprayed up in any colour you want. I did this to my old Gold Medalist during lockdown, from a tatty, chipped blue to a nice metalic purple. And when that's starting to look a bit tatty I'm just going to paint it in something new.
 

nbuuifx

Member
is it a painted riser? If it is you can always sand off the old paint and get it sprayed up in any colour you want. I did this to my old Gold Medalist during lockdown, from a tatty, chipped blue to a nice metalic purple. And when that's starting to look a bit tatty I'm just going to paint it in something new.
It is a cast magnesium riser, which is either dipped or painted I'm not sure I'd rather not strip it back. I just thought the plasti dip paint looked interesting as it looks do be quite a durable finish but can peel off to leave the original finish off you change your mind. You can also touch up areas that get damaged. My only worry was things like the rest. I think if want to leave the rest stuck to the original paint as I could imagine it pulling the paint off otherwise, but that could be masked.
 

Timid Toad

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You'd need to key it, yes, and then probably seal it with a clear coat.
 

Narrowboat70

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Hi Nduufix,
I had a similar problem with a WinWin riser. It was carbon black and badly scratched. I considered the options stated above but in the end opted for Power Coating. This entails vapor blasting to remove the current coating back to bare metal, blocking off all holes and areas you do not want coating, then spraying with powder of your preferred colour and them baking. The result is a very hard and durable coating. It cost me about £50 and was completed in a day. It may be worth looking around your area to identify such Powder Coating companies and talking to them. I opted for yellow and now it is the talk of the circuit. Interestingly yellow risers are now available.
Hope this helps
 
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ThomVis

Member
Plastidip can do the trick when applied correctly. Multiple thin (!) layers and you have a riser in a different color, reversible if need be.
The trick is to clean well (degrease), and apply thin coats with a 10-15 minutes interval (from memory, read the can). Think at least 7 coats.
Plastidip is a wonderfull product when it comes to things you don't want coated, it's easy to peel off. Look on youtube at how-to videos, they can tell yo more than I can.
 

LittleSkink

Active member
Not really the OP question - but asking as a question because in archery kit I don't know if the materials used are the same -

In cycling you have to be really careful powder coating aluminium frames as the baking process can be detrimental to the strength / micro-structure of some heat treated aluminium alloys. I know its much less of an issue with alloy wheels on cars, so this might be related to cycle frames being welded and heat treated rather than cast of billet machined. No knowledge of Magnesium alloys in this context myself

For aluminium bike frames, its usually it is advisable to go down a gentle blast (bead blast?) and wet paint route, and it isn't actually much more expensive than powder coating.
 
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