Prong rest; advice if possible!

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Kernowlad

Supporter
Supporter
So my shiny Spot Hogg has arrived and I’ve fitted as best I can however with more adjustment comes more bits to fiddle with.
Any chance of a hand with the following?
1) What’s the best angle to have the prongs? Fairly upright, diagonal or fairly flat?
2) I can adjust the springiness of the prongs; what’s this for and is it best to be soft or firm? Or is it just related to arrow weight?
I think that’s it for now!
 

Geophys2

Active member
AIUK Saviour
I don't use a Spot Hogg (I did but switched to a Freakshow) but I had the blade angle at about 35deg, and yes adjust the springiness of the blade according to arrow weight, keep the arrow so that it just stays level. With the Freakshow we change blades for a different thickness to achieve the same and different fork widths for fat indoor arrows.
 

Kernowlad

Supporter
Supporter
Well I managed to sort it. I set the spring to lift the arrow when depressed but not bounce it. Angle also just below 45 degrees. I’d also carefully marked the exact position of the previous blade rest (Trophy Taker SS2 in very good nick if anyone is keen?! Comes with a wide and a narrow blade, both 0.10mm) and managed to match the position with this one.
Pinged a few and they went as directed and it’s definitely more stable. And looks “well bling” with its gold bits...:ROFLMAO:
 

Geophys2

Active member
AIUK Saviour
That's great, but I remember talking to one of the Compound bow techs at Lancaster Archery a few years back and he strongly recommended to keep the angle between 35 and 40 deg, so it might be worth lowering the angle a bit and raising the rest to compensate. I also have a copy of the Bow International magazine article on setting up a compound and they also said between 35 and 40.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I think the angle, or the slope of the prongs is something we can experiment with.
The angle can, to some extent, determine how much clearance there is. If the prongs were level, for example, the clearance would be very limited.
The more upright the prongs are, the less downward movement there will be during that initial downwards pressure from the arrow at the start of the power stroke.
35 to 40 degrees may " look " right...... but what have looks got to do with anything?
Some set the spring stiffness so the rest only reaches its fully up position as the arrow nears full draw. They say that makes it softer for the arrow to push it out of the way to give better clearance. Others might say the rising prongs might cause the arrow to bounce on the draw cycle and fall off the rest.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
AIUK Saviour
I used to set mine up about the 35-40 degree point. Spring tension was medium. ie not enough to move the prongs during draw. Arrow had 1/4" high paper tear as it did for all my setups. Vane pointed straight down to go through gap in prongs.
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
Regarding "springiness" - be careful not to set it too light. If it's set to *just* support the shaft, it can lead to inconsistency (I discovered in one of my forays into compound). Better to turn it up slightly from that so you don't find that on some shots, variations cause it to collapse more than others, leading to an unexplained vertical spread.
 

AndyW

Well-known member
I've always set the spring tension on my timberdoodle so as the arrow is fully supported at about 2/3 of the arrow length on the draw but the angle is preset on that.
 
Top