Serving End Loops

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
A friendly member at our archery showed me a neat way of bringing the ends of the served section together to close the loop. He used a 'figure of eight' method rather than leaving one side of the loop serving shorter and continuous winding. He made the serving so both ends were equally aligned when the jig posts were turned to close the loop. He then made 10 turns of the serving thread. BUT. He went between the two sets of string threads, under one set of string threads then back up through the centre and over the other set of string threads then back under the first string threads again. He repeated this until he had 10 turns of serving thread binding the two sets of string threads. It gives a really neat flat finish to the loop join. He the finished the rest of the serving in the usual manner.

Give it a go. It's harder to describe than to do!

Hope it helps.

Dennis
 

backinblack

Active member
A friendly member at our archery showed me a neat way of bringing the ends of the served section together to close the loop. He used a 'figure of eight' method rather than leaving one side of the loop serving shorter and continuous winding. He made the serving so both ends were equally aligned when the jig posts were turned to close the loop. He then made 10 turns of the serving thread. BUT. He went between the two sets of string threads, under one set of string threads then back up through the centre and over the other set of string threads then back under the first string threads again. He repeated this until he had 10 turns of serving thread binding the two sets of string threads. It gives a really neat flat finish to the loop join. He the finished the rest of the serving in the usual manner.

Give it a go. It's harder to describe than to do!

Hope it helps.

Dennis
Hi Albatross,

Sorry if this is a silly question, however, was the serving tool attached at the time or is this with a length of thread with no serving tool/ string spool attached?

Best,
Backinblack
 

buzz lite beer

Well-known member
While I couldn't find any online pics I did find an old longbow string I made in this way (now a little loose and raggy) I've also improvised with some solder wrapped around said longbow string to show the method involved

081213 007.jpg Figure of 8 served string
081213 008.jpg Path of serving
081213 009.jpg path of serving ( a little tighter)

serving tool remains attached and is woven between the two bundles of strands, and is actually drawn up toward what is going to become the end loop to prevent any gaps showing.
Hope this helps in some way clearing up the method a little bit :)
 

Mike47j

Member
It's the method shown in Simon Needham's book.

It's been suggested to me that not serving around the end loop is better, and the string lies flatter.
Has anyone tried that and does it make any difference ?
 

buzz lite beer

Well-known member
Yes, tried that as well, only issue I had with that method is during stringing, I don't use a bow-stringer and so when pushing the loop over the nocks some of the strands don't always make it into position, I have heard of some folk experiencing grooves been cut into the back of the limb nocks but apparently this was due to one particular strand being shorter than the rest within the loop (badly uneven tensioned string when made).
A string made this way (without the loop ends being served) doesn't make a huge difference, you can just make strings a little bit faster and use less serving material.
 

BillM

Member
It's a method we were shown during our coach course and does give a stronger finish to the end loop. You need a small flat spool like those used by net makers and all the serving is done with it. We were also shown that just continuing the serving by overlapping the back section is quicker and much easier, and almost as strong. I use the second method and haven't had a string fail on me - YET.

BillM
 

ThomVis

Member
We were also shown that just continuing the serving by overlapping the back section is quicker and much easier, and almost as strong. I use the second method and haven't had a string fail on me - YET.
The way I do it now, less fuzz getting the ends to meet up nicely. I going to give the 'figure of eight' method a go in the future, see what happens. Thanks.
 

BillM

Member
It's worth giving it a go. A bit more fiddly but unlike the picture from buzz lite beer, you need to keep the figure of eight loops together where the two bits meet before continuing with the remainder of the serving so you get a much stronger and neater finish. AND, remember to pull them tight. The first few you do will probably need to be taken apart and started again but with practice you can get a really good looking end loop. The method I now use is a lot guicker and just as neat.

BillM
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
Sounds interesting. Please could you do it and point a camera at it? Pictures/moving images always convey more information that abstract words.
Here is a pic I have just taken.

Figure 8 Loop Pic.jpg

Dennis

P.S. He did not say where he learned it. But I am glad he showed it to me.

P.P.S. @ backinblack. The serving tool was attached all the time. I spread the two string 'sides' as I fed it through.
 

ThomVis

Member
Still would like to see a video of this. Tried it a week ago on a new string, didn't turn out as neat as I would like to. Certainly not as tight as the example strings shown.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
Still would like to see a video of this. Tried it a week ago on a new string, didn't turn out as neat as I would like to. Certainly not as tight as the example strings shown.
I think the secret is to initially serve the 'loop' slightly loose. Leave enough string in the 'loop' to grab it and pull it tight and butted up against the previous turn. I spread the two bundles of string apart to allow my serving tool to be passed between them for the next loop. Incidentally my serving tool for this section is a 'fisherman's Fly Tieing' bobbin holder. It is smaller than my 'serving' tool and is easily gripped to allow pulling the serving thread tight.

Dennis
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Friskney Bowmen had a great set of pics of serving end loops. If you know how to serve loops already, the pics work very well.
Instead of using serving thread, the two tails of the actual bow string are used to serve the loop that they are nearer to. This wrapping also ties in the tails without knots. When the stage is reached where the two sides are brought together, one tail is used to wrap and the other is left along the string line to be wrapped over. Serving thread is then used to wrap the central section of the string just as normal. The end result is a loop that is neatly served and there is no gaps or thick overlapping at the part where the v of the loop meets the string.
To serve the other loop a separate piece of bow string is wound round, as if using serving thread. Again, the result is a smooth transition from loop to bow string with no double bulges.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
It's a pity the pics do not appear to be available any longer. I searched their site without any success.

Dennis
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
It's a pity the pics do not appear to be available any longer. I searched their site without any success.
Hi Dennis, the serving is all done while the string is on the jig, round the two end posts. There is no need to serve with the posts in rectangular arrangement. In fact two posts is all that is needed for the jig.
Imagine you were serving the string without serving the end loops.
Then imagine trying to wrap the loose strands of the loop with bow string not serving thread.
That would leave the ends of the string loose rather than under the central end serving. So, do the loop serving and go a little further so the ends are buried under the final serving.
The loops have to be served by hand but the time saved by not having to serve two sections for the loop then change the jig, makes it quicker, too.
When you serve the loops normally you have two starts and two finishing off sections to go through. This way has winding only, no finishing off parts.
 
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