Shooting over water

Simon Banks

New member
I've always had an issue shooting over water for distance estimation, in that my arrows always go short. Had a opportunity to practice over a fishing pond at the weekend and same thing. Any advice?



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Del the Cat

Active member
If it's a pond, look along the side of the pond to see how far you'd walk to get to the target.
Failing that, just go a fingers width higher (as seen at the tip of the arrow), or top of the target rather than the kill.
Del
You could get more practice by putting your water bottle on the ground in front of you every time you shoot ;)
 


KidCurry

Active member
I was watching an archer just last week shooting what looked like a world circuit shoot over water. Although a known 70m they said shooting over water always gave the impression that the target was closer than it really was.
 


Del the Cat

Active member
"I've always had an issue shooting over water"
That attitude is also part of the problem...
I hate the bedded deer 3Ds so after a series of poor shots when we came to a bedded deer... I said,
"Great I love these bedded deer, they are my fave', I want to first on this one"
That gave me a positive attitude and no time to think about screwing up.
Del
(Yes... first arrow kill)
 


bobbyger74

New member
I was at a 3d tournament last week (only my second ever). They were really nasty buggers. one was a minus target. 2 ducks on head down eating (minus points), other head up directly behind (plus points). Shooting through bushes/trees, downhill and across water. First shot, front target -20 points. I made up for it later, 70 meters up on the slope of a hill, 2 deer. one head down eating other standing directly behind. First arrow kill.
 


Simon Banks

New member
Just to add I do shot instinctive aiming so whilst aiming higher sounds like an option it's really not that simple ;-). I don't think about the distance in abstract terms it's just 'there'.
I guess I better just practice as much as can over water until my brain Susses it ;-)


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Simon Banks

New member
"I've always had an issue shooting over water"
That attitude is also part of the problem...
I hate the bedded deer 3Ds so after a series of poor shots when we came to a bedded deer... I said,
"Great I love these bedded deer, they are my fave', I want to first on this one"
That gave me a positive attitude and no time to think about screwing up.
Del
(Yes... first arrow kill)
What shocks me about 'over water' is I can do three perfect shots and group them off under the kill. My brain thinks the target is closer than it is. It's unsettling.. :-(


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Simon Banks

New member
Aiming off is a big no no with IA because your offsetting the shot which means your bringing thought into it.
But I appreciate what your saying... :)


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Del the Cat

Active member
Then there are only two answers, practice, or think some thoughts (not necessarily even when you are shooting*) to effect your perception without "aiming"... like imaging you shooting in the water and it's slowing your arrow, just a silly though like that may just soak into you brain and give it that slight nudge it needs.
The power of thought is amazing.
I while ago I had some extensive sinus surgery and the consultant was talking me though it and saying that the natural resultant swelling isn't actually a helpful response from the body.
As I was waiting to go down, I concentrated on a mental image of men in white coats inside my head hosing down the inside with cool fresh water to calm any swelling, and saying to myself there won't be any swelling... there won't be any swelling.
After the op' the consultant came round, told me the inside of my head had been like an old fashioned glue pot, then he said.... "There's very little swelling!" :)
Del
* Maybe imagine it before you go to sleep at night.
 


Thunk

Well-known member
Ironman
As a recurve target archer I can't ever recall shooting over water. Does the width of the water make any difference? I'm wondering if there's a physical answer, maybe something to do with air temperature being lower and density higher over water?
 


dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
I suspect that it's an optical illusion thing.

Course layouts do all sorts of things to mess with your distance perception. Logs in front of the target or targets down a tunnel of trees are two obvious ones - they really mess me up.

I doubt that it's a physical effect. Although I could be wrong. It has been known (ask my wife ).
 


English Bowman

Active member
Not a tip for those of us that don't use sights, but if you're shooting compound with a scope and it's a calm day make sure that you aim at the target, not the reflection. I saw a good compound archer score a perfect 6 on the reflection. (GNAS field shooting roundels)
 


Simon Banks

New member
Was taking it over with my fellow field archers at this mornings club shoot. The consensus was it was common to misjudge over water because of lack of features.


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4d4m

Member
Sorry for the thread necromancy

As a recurve target archer I can't ever recall shooting over water. Does the width of the water make any difference? I'm wondering if there's a physical answer, maybe something to do with air temperature being lower and density higher over water?
This phenomenon has been noted in Field Target shooting (FT) which I've done since the late 1980s. "Pellets drop lower when shooting over water".
This has not been proven one way or the other however I do believe there is an effect, though it may be small.

Of course in field archery I can see there could be a psychological effect on range estimation and this could well be greater than any physical effect. However in FT most shooters use focal length rangefinding via high mag scopes, so unless the water is changing the refractive index of the air, the effect has a physical basis.

I'm not sure of the exact mechanism. Air density increasing drag may be a factor but my theory is that the water cools the air causing a gentle downward air current (the opposite of a thermal). Airgun pellets are heavily affected by wind and the gentlest of breeze that you can barely feel on your face can move a pellet out of the 40mm kill zone at 50+ yards.
 


Andy!

Member
There are no environmental factors which adversely affect a projectile travelling over water.

Archers just won't let this one go.
 


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