taking archery photographs

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Yew Selfbow

Active member
John
The photograph of the arrow on your blog front page is absolutely stunning.

Looking forward to seeing more of your work
 

eljetico

Supporter
Supporter
Top tips for using other people's (and institution's) photos on your sites are

a. get permission.
b. don't do it without permission.

If you're serious about photography, you'll appreciate why this is right.
 
Top tips for using other people's (and institution's) photos on your sites are

a. get permission.
b. don't do it without permission.

If you're serious about photography, you'll appreciate why this is right.
I'm not very serious about photography, but I do appreciate this. I did give credit for where it came from on my Facebook page. But I didn't ask, no. If it is something on someone personal page (e.g. Flickr) I do ask (and have, many times), and 'specific' photos by individuals (as opposed to some gag picture already shared 200 times) get a credit and usually a link - unlike about 99% of blogs as far as I can make out.

I agree that as a policy is not necessarily consistent, and if I was running a website that made any money at all things would be different. As it is, I believe I am covered by 'fair dealing' for a lot of things. I at least hope I keenly understand what that means as intended, I don't use it as a shield. Cheers.
 

eljetico

Supporter
Supporter
OK, great you ask permission of Flickr users but simply crediting and providing links back to the owner are not enough for the other cases. That, nor the excuse that everyone else is doing it will protect you if the owner (or any other holder of copyright) decides to object to your using their property.

Bloggers/club site owners etc should be aware that photographers (or any owner of intellectual property) can pursue you in court for this kind of thing: doesn't matter if your site is commercial or otherwise. Whether they will is, of course, the risk you take. There are many cases where bloggers have been legally - and financially - wrung out.

I apologise for diverting the thread - I was prompted by the exchange with Yew Selfbow above about 'grabbing' a picture and got a bit puckered.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
This raises some interesting questions.
I would expect sites like Facebook and Google sites (where my Bowyers Diary resides) possibly (probably?) have small print signing over the copyright (IP or whatever) of the images to them.
This doesn't worry me, as if you do a google images search for just about anything relating to wooden bows, my images will appear :).
This raises the point that, if you want your images seen and linked to your site, then give them sensible names.
IMG00123 won't get looked at, but Exploding Warbow will.

I don't think I've used other people's images, I even go to the trouble of informing people if I mention them by name (a rare occurrence). I fully appreciate that one's work should be acknowledged, and I PM'd someone when they used a pic of mine as their avatar... I was happy for it to be used as long as it was acknowledged as my work should anyone enquire.
It's a thorny subject, but I tend to hold the view that if you put it into the public domain, you are tacitly allowing it to be used (with suitable acknowledgement).
IMO museum stuff should definitely count as public domain, as making the information accessible to the public is their purpose.
Del
 

eljetico

Supporter
Supporter
What, you mean you didn't read the T&C's, Del ? ;-)

As far as I understand it, Facebook (and the others in a similar way) stipulate that in using their services you agree to giving them pretty much total rights to use, distribute etc your images for their own purposes, but ultimately you still own copyright.

Your images do not, however, become 'public domain' after exposure on social networks - you own the intellectual property - so are still covered by the usual rules. How you defend against unauthorised use beyond the network after uploading images to FB etc gets difficult, though...(BTW 'Fair Use' is complex but basically revolves around public interest usage i.e., reporting, reviews, critique etc).

For a lot of snappers (and who isn't a 'photographer' these days?), this is not a problem: as Del points out giving over your pictures to the interweb can be a handy thing if you're happy to basically give up rights to the image but end-users (sites, bloggers) should be aware that the charity of all photographers should not be assumed.

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, this is not legal advice - I just work in the industry.
 

eljetico

Supporter
Supporter
...and museum images are not necessarily Public Domain. You need to check with them: they may allow 'scholarly' use but not for commercial/entertainment.
 
...but simply crediting and providing links back to the owner are not enough for the other cases.
But crediting the original source does have implication relating to fair dealing, as does non-commerciality of the enterprise. You are not covered, it's true, but the way the material is presented is relevant in the eyes of the law.

I was prompted by the exchange with Yew Selfbow above about 'grabbing' a picture and got a bit puckered.
Yeah, that was a rotten choice of word.

Anyway, in the spirit of things I've removed that header picture and changed it to one of my own. I also had a trawl through my Wordpress archive and cleaned house a bit. Ta.
 

eljetico

Supporter
Supporter


Anyway, in the spirit of things I've removed that header picture and changed it to one of my own. I also had a trawl through my Wordpress archive and cleaned house a bit. Ta.
It's rough but probably wise. You've got an interesting and really popular blog there: it would be a real shame if a minor transgression (in the scheme of things) was to take it out.

Out of interest, did Dean touch on this kind of thing during the workshop?
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
Interesting discussion.
You are right about public domain in this context. I was confusing it with patent law where you can't patent something that has been previously made available/accessible by someone else for public view... e.g it is in the "public domain".
So if I post a picture showing details of my new "certain gold" release mechanism ;), someone can't then patent the mechanism... mind patents aren't worth zip unless you are a multinational. On that topic Clarence N Hickman was very good about making all his archery inventions freely available for all to use, and in some cases allowing manufacture thereof.
Del
 
It's rough but probably wise. You've got an interesting and really popular blog there: it would be a real shame if a minor transgression (in the scheme of things) was to take it out.

Out of interest, did Dean touch on this kind of thing during the workshop?
Thanks. It was mentioned in the workshop, and I believe Dean said something to the effect of he gets in touch if he sees his material being used commercially without permission, but generally he's fairly relaxed about things. I can't quite remember though, so I just messaged him to see if he had anything to add. One of the other AIUK-ers who went may remember something.
 

bimble

Well-known member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
AIUK Saviour
I seem to recall that he said he liked to be given credit (or even better if asked first), but I also remember that it wasn't worth wasting more money on lawyers than you'd get from going to court.
 
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