The bow arm Push?

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE
Hi Steve, I agree about the use of words being a bit vague at times. BUt the part I am concerned with is the fact the bow arm being out of line, with the draw force requires an extra force or component to maintain its position left to right. The draw arm faces a similar situation in that the humerus isn't in line with the draw force either. But its lever is half the length so is less likely to weaken at full draw.
This is why recurve archers get as close to the bow as they can, to get the force line as close to those bones as possible. Compound archers, you have much smaller forces to deal with at full draw can be a bit more relaxed. This allows a more comfortable head position and less neck strain. When you look at archery shots, every (and I do mean everything) is a compromise over the ideal. This is simply a consequence of not being able to put our bodies into he plane the bows are acting in. Cheers!
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Cheers Steve,
One of the things I find with compound shooting is that the lower holding weight allows me to stand less in line. Standing like that forces me to use more force to the left from the bow arm, to counter the pull to the right from the bow. That means, for me at least, that I am less likely to forget to "work" the bow arm as it is more obvious. It also gives me better string path clearance; I am so slim that I can get very close to the string path with my bow arm and shoulder; rather like a cardboard cut out would be.
 
Cheers Steve,
One of the things I find with compound shooting is that the lower holding weight allows me to stand less in line. Standing like that forces me to use more force to the left from the bow arm, to counter the pull to the right from the bow. That means, for me at least, that I am less likely to forget to "work" the bow arm as it is more obvious. It also gives me better string path clearance; I am so slim that I can get very close to the string path with my bow arm and shoulder; rather like a cardboard cut out would be.
I argue that "standard for for compound archers is not the Archer's Triangle but with the shoulder line parallel to the arrow line, making an "Archer's Trapezoid," as it were. Unlike most coaches I don't recommend an open stance as it encourages shoulder lines further off line. There is no benefit from such a stance, although people will claim there are.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi Steve, The trapezoid is what I find myself leaning towards. I can end up with string contact with the bow arm if I go too close to a triangle.
 
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