The point where the arrow leaves the string?

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

AJBrady

Active member
Hi TT I was not saying that the arrow stops flexing at or after separation.
The flexing continues from the start of the finger release and is still going on when the arrow hits the target.That has been seen in videos
What I am saying is that the side to side movement of the front of the arrow, stops at the point where the flex is maximum and about to change direction and flex back the opposite way. I think that separation from the string takes place at maximum flex. When the side to side movement has stopped.( or is very slight.)
When it comes to the technical side of archery I'm right alongside Oddball in Kelly's Heroes, " I only ride 'em, I don't know what makes 'em work." But why do you think that separation would take place at that point? Surely it would be the point at which the forward movement of the bowstring is less than the speed of the arrow, which does not seem to have any connection with horizontal flexing?
 

Timid Toad

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Fonz Awardee
Ironman
Hi TT I was not saying that the arrow stops flexing at or after separation.
The flexing continues from the start of the finger release and is still going on when the arrow hits the target.That has been seen in videos
What I am saying is that the side to side movement of the front of the arrow, stops at the point where the flex is maximum and about to change direction and flex back the opposite way. I think that separation from the string takes place at maximum flex. When the side to side movement has stopped.( or is very slight.
Nope, can't see that as a given in every set up or every shot.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Hi AJBrady. Thanks for your post. I think your response has hit on a slightly different aspect of separation. It seems that your response answers the question, "What causes separation?"
My question is about the state the shaft is in at that point. Is it at full flex or not?
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
Thanks for the video. It certainly shows( at about 3;40) that the bend in the arrow is not a single flex but an S shape of sorts.
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
yes, but normal release creates a similar S shaped bending. It is this extra bending ( not just the regular flexing that is seen after release) that I feel needs to be considered .
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
The S shape complicates the flexing action of the shaft. That complication is there while the arrow is on the string and the simple flexing can be seen after separation. At the point of separation the shaft is under the influence of the string and the S shape, as it takes a short space of time for the string's influence to decay.
 
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