[American Flatbow] trad recurve poundage dilemma

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Andyt23

Member
I've recently taken to 3d shooting, and so far have very much enjoyed taking the extra bits off my CXT target setup and using that, but what I really want to do is get a one piece recurve to get a bit further away from the target world I shoot in most of the time.

I've noticed that since I'm not holding for as long, and also maybe because I reference at the side of my face rather than under my chin (?), I'm suddenly finding it so much easier to draw, handle and shoot with. The bow feels so much lighter that I'm considering upping the poundage for a wooden recurve and I'm wondering how far I can go.

I currently have 43lbs on my fingers on a CXT riser with long W&W RCX100 limbs, and I'm finding it very easy to draw when shooting barebow.
I'm shooting 3 times a week so I get plenty of practice.

A couple of things have thrown themselves into the mix...

I'm liking the look of bodnik bows, in particular the Redman, not least because they do a 64" 'long' version that would mean I don't need to worry about finger pinching, something they suggested to me might be an issue as their 62" version will have a 90 degree string angle at 31" draw, which I am very near to at 30.5".

The extra cost however, to get a 64" version of the bow made is quite considerable (and then there's the wait...), but I've found one at a very good price online. The only issue is that at 55lb @ 28" I'm wondering if it might be too much, as I'd be pulling nearer 58-60lb on it.

So, and I promise not to quote anyone, but... is 58lb a monster bow that I should stay away from or would it be suited to the style of shooting that I'll be using it for? I was going to go for maybe [email protected] 28", but it would cost me nearly 200 quid more for the same bow.
Would it be any easier to draw being a 64" bow rather than 62" (but both are of course shorter than the 70" CXT I currently use)?
Would finger pinch really be a problem on a 62" bow if the string is at 90 degrees?

I can't get to the shop to try it but I'm very tempted by the bargain, which on the one hand might draw as smooth as butter, shoot rockets and be the best thing ever, or it could simply be too much bow. I know people shoot similar or higher poundage with longbows and hunting recurves that I've seen on you tube etc, so whats the story there? I'm hoping they are easier to shoot than the number suggests, presumably due to less time being taken over the shot.

I'm taken in by it's looks, but at the end of the day I want an awesome bow, not an unused ornament.
I know none of you can really say "buy it" or "don't buy it", but I'm interested in opinions.
 

Del the Cat

Well-known member
I can only talk from my experience, but I'd say 58# is a lot to be pulling all day especially at this time of year.
I don't think it's really necessary at 3D ranges as a modern recurve is faster than a wooden bow.
Personally I'd say 50# reasonable weight. (I shoot 45#)
I'm finding my draw is shortening and the weight I can manage comfortably is reducing as I age.
Sure I can still pull 80# for a few shots, but it's about consistency across the day.
Only you can really know.
I don't think the longer riser will make that much difference. It's a matter of deciding if it is cost effective and modern bows have a much bigger margin of overdraw than a wooden bow. (remember 3" extra draw is only about 1" extra tip deflection)
A string angle of 90 degrees may be optimal, but an extra couple of inches of draw won't effect it much.
We all handle our money in different ways, either saving for the thing we really covet or making, adapting, compromising.
I'd suggest compromising in brand or riser length rather than draw weight... but then I've never bought a bow! (I make 'em)
Each to his own.
Del
PS. Extra draw weight and power is sometimes self limiting as it will probably need a heavier arrow so any speed gain will be marginal.
Chasing speed can result in hand shock or a shed load of stabilisers added on, resulting in more weight being lugged around all day and a tired inconsistent archer.
 

Timid Toad

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My thoughts are that anything over 50lbs you are really going to feel, and buying on spec without finding out what the (possibly) 60lbs does to you would be a mistake. You run the risk of injury, ruining your form and spoiling your love of the sport. You really need to be a master of your bow. If you are unable to go try, my suggestion would be to park the high end bow idea for a while, and look for a cheaper one piece to get you started. You can always trade up later.
 

Geophys

Member
I shoot recurve target with 42lb on the fingers and a 66" bow at 27" draw length, I also shoot Field and 3D with a tradbow and of course wood arrows. I have two tradbows both give me 40lb otf , I have never felt underbowed on the field course. My main takedown Field bow has a 17" Timber Creek riser and medium limbs to give a 60" bow. Don' forget with an unsighted bow the furthest target is going to be 50m on a marked course. I shoot 'instinctive' with three fingers under with no problems all the way to 50m.

On a wet muddy day in the woods you want to be pulling a comfortable draw weight rather than the maximum as by the end you may be just a little fatigued.

I'd stick with 40-45lb bow, something like a Ragim Black Panther for a while and upgrade later when you feel you need to.
 

Andyt23

Member
Ach I know you're all right - if it was ten (!) pounds lighter it would be my dream bow, but if I compromise for the sake of having it NOW and getting a bargain then I suppose it should be on something like colour, not the fundamental shootability of the bow.

I suppose the idea of a cheapy to get me going is a good one, so I can take a step in the direction I want to go and leave the cxt at home, and I can save the 'perfect bow' for when its the right time.
Thanks for talking me down folks, the perils of being left alone after Christmas with a computer nearly had me there.

Am I being over cautious looking for a longer bow then, if you don't think finger pinch will necessarily be a problem it opens up more and cheaper options (obviously checking max draw length first).
 

Timid Toad

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I would suggest following manufacturer's recommendations as to bow length vs draw length.
 

Geophys

Member
Have you thought about an ILF wood riser, something like the Ragim Red Lion, it's a 19" riser and can take any ILF limbs, so with long limbs it would be a 64" bow, my Cedar Creek is 17" and I use medium limbs for a 60" bow. There are lots of cheap limbs out there you can swap out until you get your perfect weight. 34lb limbs on a 19" riser would give 40lb weight at 28". (Add a pound to limbs stated weight for every inch the riser is shorter than 25")
 

Andyt23

Member
After heeding your warnings I decided to head to the local shop and try some different weight traditional bows to see what they felt like, to hopefully avoid making a potentially costly mistake...

So instead I've made a potentially dead cheap mistake :cheerful:

I had a few shots with a 45lb Samick Sage that came out about 52lbs on me, and found it light and comfy to hold, very fast and quiet to shoot with little in the way of hand shock. I was quite surprised for the money - although of course I have nothing to compare it with and will only tell over time and varied distances how it's really going to perform.

I got some 4 inch feathers stuck on my existing power flight arrows and they seem to work fine, at least at 10 yards, so for 93 quid I just jumped right in and bought it! It just seems a no brainer to get me doing what I really want to do with 3D.

It was immediately a lot of fun to shoot (first traditional recurve), so I thought what better way to get going and find out what I may eventually want from a more refined or 'dream bow' than to just start shooting it and see what happens.

Thanks for the advice. I may have still been impetuous, but for the money I really don't care. I've never been so happy spending so little money on archery kit!
 

Geophys

Member
I believe that the Samick Sage is the biggest selling bow in the world. One of my club mates shoots a Samick SLB and is very difficult to beat! There does seem a trend at my club for a lot of the sighted bow shooters, particularly the recurve shooters to get a tradbow of some sort as a kind of back to basics fun shooting thing, almost a way of getting back to the joy of archery.
 

turtle

Member
I'd strongly recommend not going so high in poundage. I suspect you will regret it. It will wear you down and this can be cumulative over time. It will put much more load on joints, tendons etc and this can only be a bad thing. I think anywhere from 40-45 lb OTF is ample for everything and FWIW, there are many excellent bow options that don't entail custom orders that will serve your long draw. My son has a 31+ inch draw despite only just starting and I am putting long limbs on my 19" Satori riser to give him 64". You could probably find a lovely looking 19-21" riser and find some long limbs you like the look of to put together a nice looking bow that will draw beautifully and be a good overall size for you. You will then also have the option of changing limbs if you desire. Geophys has it nailed.

Just saw you bought a Sage at 45#. enjoy!
 
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