What Matters Most?

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

little-else

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so bow a t/d recurve so bow being on the short side isnt the death of things and arrows not too long or too short. In the US they are favoured for hunting for the very reason they arent so good for target. The curve at the tip of the limbs will be made to suit if they are also by the same manufacturer so wont be "wrong".
A lot of whether you will be able to settle in with what you have will depend on your shooting style. The use of a release may not fit in with AGB target recurve rules but that doesnt stop you from enjoying yourself but your anchor will be different to a regular archer.
Best way of determining how to improve with what you have is to ahve someone who understands your requirements standing next to you and watching you loose off a few arrows and then suggests changes one at a time rather than telling you it is all to pot and you need to do this and that and stand on your head and say moo all at the same time. if the first club you enquire at cant help you in that respect go and ask at another.
My thoughts on sling string release? suitable adjustment for your disability but as said earlier, it will have an effect on how the arrow takes off and someone with a decent knowledge of setting up a button should be able to sort you out.
As for arrow rest, nocking point etc, again you can best be served by someone watching you and then trying small adjustments around what is the norm.
the other thing they should do is listen to you shooting, that can tell you a lot about bracing height, nock position, button etc by the noise it all makes
 

English Bowman

Well-known member
so bow a t/d recurve so bow being on the short side isnt the death of things and arrows not too long or too short. In the US they are favoured for hunting for the very reason they arent so good for target. The curve at the tip of the limbs will be made to suit if they are also by the same manufacturer so wont be "wrong".
Looking at it, it's a cheap Korean bow, and the limbs are standard recurve, so I'd say that a 62" one of those is way too short for a 28" draw.
 

chrisgas

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Try a 10 year old Ardbeg. It’s hard to beat below £50. The Lidl stuff is perfectly decent but this is on another level.
Just finished a bottle of Laphroig and started a 15 yr old Glenfiddich. Both were presents ;) Not that I´m a lush or anything.. I used to live just outside Inverness for 20 years.
 

Kernowlad

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Just finished a bottle of Laphroig and started a 15 yr old Glenfiddich. Both were presents ;) Not that I´m a lush or anything.. I used to live just outside Inverness for 20 years.
Well my surname is Sutherland so clearly I’m as good as local (my great grandfather came from there though)!
I’m quite into a good dram though; Laphroaig hits the spot sometimes but it’s pretty hardcore!
Sometimes I like a peaty Islay other times it’s a more mellow Speyside!
 

chrisgas

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Well my surname is Sutherland so clearly I’m as good as local (my great grandfather came from there though)!
I’m quite into a good dram though; Laphroaig hits the spot sometimes but it’s pretty hardcore!
Sometimes I like a peaty Islay other times it’s a more mellow Speyside!
We lived about four miles from Muir of Ord and its Glen Ord, the oldest distillery in Scotland. It has a good visitor centre and was well visited when we had friends come to stay. Tain and Sutherland were only a half hour drive and some great malts like Glen Morangie and Dalmore. my favourite whisky has to be a Macallen. Sutherland is a beautiful place I love the Dornoch firth, Dornoch seems to be the gateway to a different part of Scotland where the peaty grasslands come to the sea and it has more rolling hills than the mountains and peaks of the more rugged west coast. The Duke of Sutherland still manages to raise the blood of many a local it seems...
 
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little-else

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Suntory bought up a lot of the Scottish distilleries. They wanted to know why whisky varietiestastes as they do and the nearest determination is the water source. they paid a couple of geologists well to do the surveying. Its a tough job but someone had to do it.
 

4d4m

Active member
There's a nice postgrad thesis there for a whisky-loving geology student. As long as the research phase doesn't get too enjoyable. :)
 

Geophys2

Member
There's a nice postgrad thesis there for a whisky-loving geology student. As long as the research phase doesn't get too enjoyable. :)
There is already a good book on the effect of the underlying geology on the water used to make Whisky called "Whisky on the Rocks", which describes the geology of Scotland and Northern Ireland and its impact on the nature of the malt whisky produced in different districts. One of my old students was involved in its production. I did my own PhD field work many years ago on Skye, so obviously Talisker is my favourite malt.
 

little-else

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Author's name is familiar, I'm sure it was he who did geochemistry guest lectures on the same. The most contentious bit about his ideas is the changing of the highland/lowland boundary and thoughts on why certain island malts actually taste as they do.
 
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