Which compound bow?

Pablete

Member
Thanks for your time
I shot recurve barebow 30#, draw length 27.3/4. Planning to buy a compound so which poundage and model do you recommend?
Thanks in advantage.
 

ArcheryFox

Active member
I was shooting a #38 recurve when I switched. I started at #40 peak weight and gradually wound the weight up over the year, successfully avoiding injury. I would suggest starting somewhere around #40 Peak and working up from there if you are serious about developing proper technique.

As for model and make that is entirely up to you. How much do you want to spend, where are you buying from etc. etc.
At a draw length of 27.75 I would tentatively suggest something in the 36-38" axle-to-axle range.
There can be some variation in preference including depending on what format you want to shoot (target/field/3D etc).

As this is your first compound I would say consider something with reasonably easily adjustable draw length rather than modules.
I would also say consider a hybrid cam system as possibly easier to get your head around/maintain for a new starter.
However, these are entirely up to you, and you could reasonably be fine with anything.

As with all archery equipment, it depends on what is available and what feels good to you.
I'd suggest going along to a shop to try, or seeing what you can borrow from club members.

Remember that the mass-weight of a compound is likely to be heavier than you are used to, and that you will also probably be needing various accessories in your budget (release aid, new arrows, and stabiliser at minimum).
 

Kernowlad

Supporter
Supporter
As @ArcheryFox says, there are lots of options but go for something very adjustable like a Hoyt Klash. I moved to a more focussed bow (Mybo Origin) a bit too early and struggled with it.
Maybe start with a basic pin sight (again I movedto an expensive sight too early) and I’d look at a wrist release rather than a hand held one.
As it happens I’ve gone the opposite way after my compound gave me release shoulder/back issues. I’m hanging onto it (probably £2k including arrows!) and hoping to use it again but take it easy; it’s too tempting to go for the most powerful/fastest as the attraction of extreme accuracy beckons but it’ll bite you on the backside if you aren’t careful.
 

Pablete

Member
Thanks for the feedback ArcheryFox, Kernowlad.
I had a look at Hoyt Klash. Kernowlad you are right. I love its adjustability. Unfortunately I am not sure if it has been discontinued.
Does the Bowtech’s Deadlock tech worth the price? Does it make a difference adjusting the bow?
 
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KidCurry

Well-known member
AIUK Saviour
You don't say what your budget is, your intended use or your compound experience. There are so many bows out there now that choosing one is both easier and harder than its ever been. Short axle bows have different pro's and con's compared to longer axel bows. Some have fixed drawlengths, some are hugely adjustable but not always what they seem. Budget and use will be the driving requirements. Do you want to pay £150, £300, £800 or £1200 for example? What sort of physical bow weight are you used to?
 

ArcheryFox

Active member
Put it this way, I have never had a problem with a (non-Deadlock) bow falling massively out of tune once I had set it up, and I have never heard anyone else complain either. Moving the cams left to right with a screw is admittedly easier than using packing shims, but gets the same result at the end of the day - and shims have far fewer parts to go wrong. You can also get the same sort of results with cam lean and other tuning methods. So I'd tentatively see it as a fad.

I think worrying about this specific is trying to run a marathon before you can walk, however!

I often suggest people look at the PSE Stinger/Phenom as one good starting point for compound. They might have been superseded by the Lazer? I'm not super up-to-date on the latest bows. At the same time, if you are serious about making progress I can understand wanting to get a decent bow.
 

Sinbad

Member
I started a number of years ago with a PSE supra (cheaper in those days but you could find a good second hand one) excellent bow, now shoot hoyt as i preferred the solid wall when i was looking, but it also has a lot more weight to it which takes time to get used to. The adjustment of the PSE was fantastic, and would be a quicker seller if you decide to move to something different in the future.

I wouldn't skimp on the release if you intend to use one, but see if you can try a number of different types if you can.
 

Kernowlad

Supporter
Supporter
Thanks for the feedback ArcheryFox, Kernowlad.
I had a look at Hoyt Klash. Kernowlad you are right. I love its adjustability. Unfortunately I am not sure if it has been discontinued.
Does the Bowtech’s Deadlock tech worth the price? Does it make a difference adjusting the bow?
Mine was a Hoyt Ignite; I think the Klash replaced it but maybe that’s gone too! Hard to keep up with the latest!
 

Pablete

Member
You don't say what your budget is, your intended use or your compound experience. There are so many bows out there now that choosing one is both easier and harder than its ever been. Short axle bows have different pro's and con's compared to longer axel bows. Some have fixed drawlengths, some are hugely adjustable but not always what they seem. Budget and use will be the driving requirements. Do you want to pay £150, £300, £800 or £1200 for example? What sort of physical bow weight are you used to?
Thanks KidCurry
I am focus on choosing the right compound, not in the budget. Buying the more expensive bow doesn’t necessarily mean the better choice. On top of that if I get into compound I need to do the maintenance, cause I live in the country side with no stores near by, so I will spend money on buying tools for my little home shop.
I don‘t want to invest more time trimming the bow than shooting. The easier to adjust the bow the better.
I want the compound to enjoy.
I have zero compound experience.
 

Pablete

Member
At the same time, if you are serious about making progress I can understand wanting to get a decent bow.
Thanks again for your suggestions AF.
I want a decent bow. Besides if I get into compound I will have to spend money on tools for maintaining.
 

chrisgas

Supporter
Supporter
Oops not in this league, got my two Junxing compounds, an M108, 40", 30-55#, 24"-30.5" draw length, looks like plastic cams. The second M129, 32", 30-70#, 19"- 31" draw length, CNC cams. For the price of a decent set of arrows. I would suggest that these possibly should be considered as decent starter bows, the M129 is absolutely dead in your hands on shooting, US made strings (two tone) and limbs "allegedly". Easy adjustable.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
AIUK Saviour
I don‘t want to invest more time trimming the bow than shooting. The easier to adjust the bow the better.
I want the compound to enjoy.
I have zero compound experience.
Again, the price will dictate if you get a 30" Axle bow or a 38" bow as these tend to be a lot more expensive. PSE Stinger is great choice for a short bow as it is a single cam, very little setting up and simple to shoot. Sanlida Prodigy bow is a good value 38" bow. You are going to need some way to press the bow.
Buying the more expensive bow doesn’t necessarily mean the better choice.
Generally it does if you want longer/more accurate bows. If the £600+ Torrex is in your price range then the PSE Laser might be worth a look for target or the Topoint Reliance. If it's for hunting it's outside my experience.
 

jerryRTD

Well-known member
Do not be too quick to dismiss short axle to axle bows, They are generally lighter, and draw weight is not the only weight that should be taken into account when getting your first compound. the lighter the bow the more weight you can have on your stabs. You will end up with a bow that is lighter and more stable for a given weight in the hand than a long axle to axle bow. That can very important at the last couple of ends on a long round.
There are problems that you will have to overcome, first is the string angle it is a bit sharp and that may make getting your eye close to the peep difficult . The second is realising how much weight on the end of the stabs you can use and how much back weight you can use.
 

Flamez

Member
AIUK Saviour
PSE are in the main fully adjustable in terms of draw weight and draw length. The longer A2A the more stable the bow should be. Doing forget if you are on a budget you will have to factor in, launcher, sight, release, stabilisers, arrows. My philosophy is buy right, cry once... [its an expensive game.}
 

Pablete

Member
Thanks Flamez. I agree with “buy right, cry once”. For me a bow is a tool, and I have always tried to buy the best tools I can. I am going to keep shooting barebow for target, so I will pick a compound for hunting. But I need a 30-40# bow so my current candidate is Hoyt, the ventum 33 specifically (with the sight on a picatinny rail and the rest integrated). It means around 2k. Thinking.
 

jerryRTD

Well-known member
You might be able to draw 50lb limbs let down to 40lbs . That way you will have a greater range rather than buy another set of 50lb limbs a few months down the line
 

Palacerigg

New member
Thanks for your time
I shot recurve barebow 30#, draw length 27.3/4. Planning to buy a compound so which poundage and model do you recommend?
Thanks in advantage.
You don't say if you are sticking to compound barebow. If you are shooting fingers the the longer the axel to axel bow would be a suitable choice as the bow in more forgiving(40"or above) . It you plan to shoot release aid the axel to axel would not be so critical. (There will be others who might disagree but what would I know, only been shooting compound fingers for over thirty years) hope this helps?
 
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