WHY should I get into making my own string? And How to keep on.

PLEASE HELP TO FUND ARCHERY INTERCHANGE

Pablete

New member
Why are you making your own string?
I do feel like making my own strings, for both my hunting bow and the 25” riser. I love getting into archery, meaning adjustment, testing, making arrows... and now I am longing for making my strings.

But from a logical standpoint I think I should not do it, cause I guess I going to make one or two string per year, so the money investment needed has no sense. I should buy neither a string jig nor a string board. To make it worse I appreciate a good tool, so getting the cheapest is out of the equation, a middle range one.

I am afraid of buying the tools and threads... just to make a string once in a while, meaning wasting money and more over, not getting the mastering that comes with a everyweek work. And eventually I will give up. I will spend money just for enjoying but how can I keep making strings and improving? Does it ring the bell to anyone?

How do you keep on making them week to week?

How can I make strings without give them for free. I am not trying to earn money but it’s not fair to just gift them away.

Please, those of you who makes your own strings, tell me your experience or advice, because I crave it, but just for myself, it make no sense.
Appreciated.
 

KidCurry

Well-known member
AIUK Saviour
I guess making my own strings is for the flexibility of strand count, serving material and size and also length adjustment; to my own specification. To be honest, once you have made a few they are a bit of a drudge. It will help if you have the work space set up for it. I will make strings for other people but only if they ask, and I don't advertise it. Don't think I've made a string in over a year. There are lots of people out there making really good strings already :)
 

Stretch

Active member
IF you are on a plan to compete and you like to “enjoy” different equipment options then make your own is the way to go. (Assuming you have the patience and attention to detail that is required to get a decent result). Materials wise it makes it easier (and long term cheaper) than buying from a GOOD string maker. It also gives you access to the materials and colours you want.

However, if you are of the “put it on the bow and replace it when it is disgusting” mentality, then you might as well just buy. As long as you can find a string builder who will build to strand count and nock fit that you specify. (Or you are happy with their default).

Personally I always found I had to rebuild centre serving to meet my requirements So you end up with at least one serving tool and serving spool anyway. I would re-do as I don’t like too much above my top finger, I tend to shoot fatter than standard strings, and for nock fit. If you make your own there is nobody else to blame. Some of the cheap string making jigs are too flexy and it takes a lot of effort to make a good string. However, many of the more expensive ones are overkill for most folks. Compared to the costs of competing it is not a high cost activity.

Mind you there are a lot of string making businesses these days so probably a few of those would work to spec.

On the other hand string making kit usually has a reasonable secondhand value.

Stretch
 

dvd8n

Supporter
Supporter
AIUK Saviour
As Stretch says, it's good to start off replacing centre servings. It prolongs the life of your strings, the financial outlay is minimal, you can play with nock fit and you won't be stuck without a string if the centre servings unravel. I'd recommend that all archers know how to do it and have the equipment necessary even if they don't make complete strings.

Plus, serving is a skill that you need to make a string and it's helpful to get to know how to do it well before embarking on making a whole string.
 

Rik

Supporter
Supporter
A serving tool is the only essential "buy".
DIY string jigs are perfectly servicable, and (if you make laid in strings) sometimes no more complicated than some pins in a board.

As to why: mainly it's about two things.
1. Control. Both of quality and customisation.
2. Self-satisfaction. The "I did that" feeling.
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
Happiness = learning + achievement + relationships. So making your own strings will make you happy.
 

Pablete

New member
Thanks guys.
You are right. Making center serving is essential, and I Do.
There isn’t too many options when it comes to buy a string jig. Right now I am looking at the Decut elite pro String Jig
I don’t know. Make a string a year doesn’t make much sense.
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
Thanks guys.
You are right. Making center serving is essential, and I Do.
There isn’t too many options when it comes to buy a string jig. Right now I am looking at the Decut elite pro String Jig
I don’t know. Make a string a year doesn’t make much sense.
Well... in your first year you’ll make 10-20, as you get better and experiment. But that won’t pay for a good jig. And a metal one is a world better than a wooden one. There’s no economic rationale - unless you see them.
 

Stretch

Active member
Thanks guys.
You are right. Making center serving is essential, and I Do.
There isn’t too many options when it comes to buy a string jig. Right now I am looking at the Decut elite pro String Jig
I don’t know. Make a string a year doesn’t make much sense.
Seems like an expensive all-bells and whistles jig to start with. Something simpler (not the Sherwood) would be enough.

But no, if you think you’ll make 1 string a year you’ll never make enough strings to be proficient.

Last time I changed string material I had three colours (black, blue, yellow). I made 2 strings to give me a higher and lower brace height with the number of twists I wanted. That done I then made up strings in 18 and 20 strand to find out which Iiked most. I then made some 2 and 3 colour candy stripe strings for fun. I then compared them all in similar lighting for bright, dark and in-between conditions. So I made a lot of strings, most of which are now redundant or “might try again”. And yes, making that many strings is BORING. But in the 80s I shot Kevlar so it is at least not continuous!

If you don’t have the mind-set to tinker with strings then I wouldn’t bother. Unless the “satisfaction of shooting your own string” rings a bell with you.

Personally I do it because then I know exactly what effort went into the string and, material flaws aside, I know what I can expect. And of course my strings are perfect and better than anyone else’s :oops:

Also worth saying that experimenting with different materials and strand count rarely gets you points but can get you the feel and sound that you like. Colour can make a big difference though, sometimes you can’t just pick the colour you like.

2p

Stretch
 

Senlac

Supporter
Supporter
And you can experiment with fewer strands generally but more under the centre serving, and centre serving materials and tension, to get the nock release just right. And thern you change your nocks....
 

geoffretired

Supporter
Supporter
I suppose I started making my own strings after I had been shooting a year or perhaps two. It seemed to make sense with the hope of many years ahead. A simple string jig cost me nothing, only my time. I had bolts and wood already waiting to be used for something.
The main reason for me was that I would never be without a string just because the shops were shut.
I like making things so it wasn't a chore.
 

BrianM

New member
To the original poster, I was in exactly the same mindset a month or so ago.

Financially it makes no sense at all to make your own strings but I like making things so I thought I'd have a go. For me the big hurdle was the cost of a string jig. After watching a few youtube videos I made one from a length of unistrut plus some scrap 6mm steel & bar I had around. So the cost for the jig was probably under £20 plus a few hours time.

Since then I've made half a dozen strings, the first one ended up in the bin because I'd made it too short. The first one also took me most of the afternoon to make, re-doing the end servings because I didn't like them, etc. I reckon I'm at the stage now where I can make something that looks passable and doesn't take me half a day.

I've been lucky because there's a guy at our club who makes strings and he's given me good advice which does help. I'm also retired so spending an hour or so making a string doesn't eat into my shooting time.

I'd say if you like the challenge of making things, learning new skills then go for it. Financially it makes no sense at all if you're just going to make strings for yourself, so accept that from day one. (but most hobbies don't make financial sense, do they ? :) )

The guy at our club who's given me advice does make strings for members and has made a couple for me in the past. He does it as a favour and only charges the cost of the materials used to cover his costs. So you could go that way, you'd gain knowledge/skills and your mates would get cheap (but good) strings.
 

albatross

Supporter
Supporter
I enjoy making strings much more than fletching arrows! I make both continuous loop and flemish twist for friends. I only make a small charge to cover the cost of the materials.
 

Pablete

New member
Thanks BrianM and albatross. You are right.
...and make a small charge to cover the cost of the material is the way to go.
 
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52BIGSBY

Member
Where are you? If you are near the mid south coast you can have my string jig.
It is just sitting in my attic....
Richard.
 

Pablete

New member
Wow Richard. I do appreciate your kind offer. Unfortunately (for many reasons) I am in Europe, north Spain.
You make my day with your kindness.
 

Pablete

New member
I will be glad to give it a home. I will have a jig and a beautiful story to tell to. But... may I ask where do you live? Is it doable? Thank you.
 

52BIGSBY

Member
I am in the South of England. It would be a big parcel and be expensive to post.
If you are keen then I can wrap it and get a quote at my post office.
Richard.
 

Pablete

New member
TY. Could we have an rough idea about how much it will be? I guess the parcel depends on the dimension but I have no clue of the prize. If it’s reasonable I will be more than eager. I live near 31000 Pamplona.
 
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