Woodies and Carbons from the same bow

A16KSB

Member
Hi
I do field/3D and shoot off the shelf.

I'd like to use the same bow for EFAA (TRB, carbon arrows) and ArcheryGb (TRAD, wooden arrows), and need some advice/help please.
In order to keep a similar trajectory, Do I try to get both arrows to weigh the same?,if so will this affect the dynamic spine of them?, or am I asking for too much?

Regards
 


Timid Toad

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I'd pretty much put money on it that it can't be done, sorry.
Weight, diameter, FOC, and the actual characteristics of wood/carbon will make it nigh on impossible.
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
I'd have though you should be able to get 'em similar enough for field archery distances.
IMO you may need to use slightly lighter wooden arrows to compensate for the drag caused by the bigger diameter shafts which will probably be needed to get a decent spine.
It should take a bit of experimentation though.
Del
 


A16KSB

Member
Thanks,

I had a feeling it would be difficult, I shoot Goldtip Traditional 600 spine, which is closer to 11/32 wooden arrows. so the diameter is taken care of.
The bow is 40lb on my fingers, so maybe if I increase the poundage a bit when shooting woodies, I may be able to get the same trajectory, however, the maximum I will go to is 45lbs.
I could also increase the size of the feathers on the carbons to add a bit more drag.

What do you think?
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
600 spine is about 45# in old money. (28/0.6)
I'd suggest a start point of 11/32" 45-50 spine choose a point weight to get the total weight a tad less than the carbons and use fletching as close to the size that you have on the carbons. Rather than changing the fletchings on the carbons.
Do the carbons have platsic fletches? If so they'll have less drag.
You can get wooden shafts of 5/16 in 45-50spine. That would bring thespeed up and make up for the increased drag of feathers.
All down to experimentation.
Del
 


A16KSB

Member
600 spine is about 45# in old money. (28/0.6)
I'd suggest a start point of 11/32" 45-50 spine choose a point weight to get the total weight a tad less than the carbons and use fletching as close to the size that you have on the carbons. Rather than changing the fletchings on the carbons.
Do the carbons have platsic fletches? If so they'll have less drag.
You can get wooden shafts of 5/16 in 45-50spine. That would bring thespeed up and make up for the increased drag of feathers.
All down to experimentation.
Del
Thanks Del.
I use 600 because GT dont make anything weaker, 700 is available by other companies but not in wood finish. The carbons currently have feathers. Yes I will be experimenting in the near future.
If I go 5/16 I'd have to put extra weight up front, (so the woodies come close to the carbon weight), this would dramatically increase FOC and weaken the arrow
 


When Del writes, one does well to read, mark well, and learn. He's both a bowyer and an archer. I second his observations. At the 55+BC Games just held in Kelowna, it was unanimous that we preserve the status quo. First day, 3D; real men and women shooting real arrows at phony animals. Second day, a Canadian 900 round, but with unsighted recurves and stickbows shooting 10m closer. Third day, 1/2 a field round, all done by 11:00. We're allowed to shoot carbon arrows and still be in the longbow class. The greatest distance a longbow shooter has to try in the 900 is 45m. Scores would be even lower if we were required to shoot lumber. I have a dozen ready to go in the arrow box, but I like the much more accurate carbons. An Easton Fatboy 500 flies really well off the shelf. For some years now, there has been no ceiling on the age category, men, 70+, longbow, so one sees octogenarians schooling the younger set.
 


A16KSB

Member
When Del writes, one does well to read, mark well, and learn. He's both a bowyer and an archer. I second his observations. At the 55+BC Games just held in Kelowna, it was unanimous that we preserve the status quo. First day, 3D; real men and women shooting real arrows at phony animals. Second day, a Canadian 900 round, but with unsighted recurves and stickbows shooting 10m closer. Third day, 1/2 a field round, all done by 11:00. We're allowed to shoot carbon arrows and still be in the longbow class. The greatest distance a longbow shooter has to try in the 900 is 45m. Scores would be even lower if we were required to shoot lumber. I have a dozen ready to go in the arrow box, but I like the much more accurate carbons. An Easton Fatboy 500 flies really well off the shelf. For some years now, there has been no ceiling on the age category, men, 70+, longbow, so one sees octogenarians schooling the younger set.
Hi, I'm a bit confused in regards to the point you are trying to make.
I shoot carbons because it is the IFAA rules, the HS style has been replaced with TRB
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
Thanks Del.
I use 600 because GT dont make anything weaker, 700 is available by other companies but not in wood finish. The carbons currently have feathers. Yes I will be experimenting in the near future.
If I go 5/16 I'd have to put extra weight up front, (so the woodies come close to the carbon weight), this would dramatically increase FOC and weaken the arrow
Out of interest what is the weight of your carbon arrows?
Del
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
The Gold Tip Traditional weigh 377 gn with 120 gn points, 2.5" feathers, arrow length is 28.5" AMO
That lines up exactly with my 5/16" Cedar shaft 100gn point 29" overall 3" parabolics fletchings!
They fly well from just about anything 😄
Del
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
They are 35-40 and I shoot 'em from anything I make under about 60# 😄, but generally from my 45# Yew primitive field bow, but when I make any bow under 60# they get used for testing/shooting in.
They waggle a bit from anything 60# and over and I start to feel the hand shock so for 60# and over I go to 11/32 and the 3/8 for the 80# @31"
My bows don't have a cut away arrow pass and shelf... (except one Osage flight bow)

It starts to get really interesting when you start making wooden flight arrows :), a lot of the conventional wisdom and rules of thumb go out of the window.
Del
 


A16KSB

Member
They are 35-40 and I shoot 'em from anything I make under about 60# 😄, but generally from my 45# Yew primitive field bow, but when I make any bow under 60# they get used for testing/shooting in.
They waggle a bit from anything 60# and over and I start to feel the hand shock so for 60# and over I go to 11/32 and the 3/8 for the 80# @31"
My bows don't have a cut away arrow pass and shelf... (except one Osage flight bow)

It starts to get really interesting when you start making wooden flight arrows :), a lot of the conventional wisdom and rules of thumb go out of the window.
Del
So are they used on bows without a shelf, i.e. the bows aren't cut to / past centre?
 


Del the Cat

Well-known member
So are they used on bows without a shelf, i.e. the bows aren't cut to / past centre?
Correct, no cutaway... but that's why I suggest you use a stiffer spine 40-45.
The weight of the shaft will be similar...
As I said, it will need some experimentation, but you should be able to get similar performance to your carbons...
The big difference will be the consistency, as wood is obviously less consistent in dimension, weigh, straightness and ruggedness
Del
 


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